Reaching Out provides service to community
Oct05

Reaching Out provides service to community

Written by Ashley Ramirez Crusaders woke up early to attend Reaching Out, an event that happens every semester. As students made their way into Shelton Theater Oct. 2, they were treated to breakfast and a T-shirt. They chose from about 20 locations to spend the morning serving in whatever way needed. The Ronald McDonald House, Helping Hands and Salvation Army were organizations visited. Freshman Allison Kelley helped at the Hope for the Hungry office building. “My group moved sheet metal, and I was the one who tallied up how many sheets were in each stack. They are using the sheet metal to build stuff around there and then sending all of the extra to Haiti,” she said. It was Kelley’s first Reaching Out to attend, and she enjoyed the experience. “I’m glad I was able to help. If we didn’t have a bunch of people helping out and moving, it would have taken the staff a while to move it all,” she said. Kelley already plans to wake up early in the spring for the next Reaching Out. “You are never more like Jesus then when you are serving, even if that does mean waking up at 8 a.m. on a Saturday,” she said. Junior philosophy major Tyler Potts is the SGA director of spiritual life. He and the four class chaplains planned this day of service projects. Contacting the locations was one of their duties. “We like to work with organizations we’ve had connections with in the past,” Potts said. The team gives students a variety of choices so they may find projects around the community they are gracious enough to do. “If you come with a prepared heart … then you can change lives and allow your heart to be influenced by the Lord,” he said. Every semester university organizations and groups go to locations to both serve as blessings and grow as teams. This year, the Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor participants and directors cleaned the Ronald McDonald House, and the Drama Ministry went to Belton Christian Youth Center to assist with yard work. Junior English major Lindsay Prater joined the group at BCYC. “I sat in the sandy playground and pulled weeds and occasionally took breaks to climb on the jungle gym,” she said. The students helping at the after school program had fun serving together. Although Prater is not part of the ministry, she felt comfortable with the group. “The thing I loved the most was the fellowship the Drama Ministry had. They were really encouraging to each other,” she said. There was a BCYC employee at the facility with a list of areas that needed...

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Silly Bandz cover arms of all genders and ages
Oct05

Silly Bandz cover arms of all genders and ages

Written by Kayla Lynch In a room of nine college students, eight of them are living proof of the recent fad that seems to be taking over the nation, Silly Bandz. From farm animals to Harry Potter characters, the rubber bracelets can take the shape of anything and everything. Once you have one on your wrist, it opens up a world of trading and sharing. “They remind me of Pokemon cards or that glitter makeup we used to wear in elementary school. They all caught on really fast, and they’re probably going to fade really fast too,” said senior psychology major Brittany Richardson. While some people may think they were made just for children, Richardson goes on to say, “I think they’re fun. I enjoy collecting and trading them.” The Bandz can come in handy when small talk topics are scarce. If someone has a few on, it’s an automatic, non-awkward conversation starter. “I think they’re funny and fun. I also like showing off the cool ones that I have,” Richardson said. Like Pokemon cards once were, the bracelets have been banned in some school districts because, unlike typical bracelets that are worn to make a fashion statement and pose as an accessory, Silly Bandz are seen more as toys. “I don’t really understand why people like them so much. I think people get caught up in these fads just because everyone else is doing it,” said Jake Hans, a student at Temple College. “I just don’t get it.” With the different colors, shapes and ability to glow in the dark, it only makes sense that kids could find them more interesting than what their teacher has to say. “If the kids are playing and trading them instead of working, that’s a problem,” Whitney Parrish a first grade teacher in the Houston Independent School District said. But the real dilemma arises when the Bandz cause arguments. “Some kids don’t understand the concept of trading. You’ll have some that think their Silly Bandz were stolen,” Parrish said. Some teachers have been said to hate them, but this teacher even has a few of her own that students gave her. The general consensus of the bracelet feedback is positive, and their popularity serves as an advocate. But not everyone is a fan. “If they weren’t such a big deal and everyone wasn’t wearing them, I might consider wearing them,” junior education major Kathryn Asikis said. While Silly Bandz are a genius idea to some, others disagree. Even people like Richardson wouldn’t mind if the bracelet craze died down soon, “It’s starting to weird me out,” she said. Junior mass communication/PR major...

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Well-known Bands Play at ACL
Oct05

Well-known Bands Play at ACL

Written by Faith Forester Austin City Limits, the famous music festival of the ever hip Austin, makes its ninth run Oct. 8-10. The festival, held in Zilker Park in  the city’s downtown, has become an autumn tradition. It brings together music lovers to the live music capital of the country for three days each fall. The lineup of more than 130 bands includes The Eagles, Phish and alternative favorite Muse. A small sampling of the lineup includes The Black Keys, Vampire Weekend, Monsters of Folk, Manchester Orchestra, Band of Horses and Cage the Elephant. Christian alternative group Switchfoot is also making an appearance Sunday evening. In addition to the all-you-can-hear musical buffet, the art community of Austin presents its creations in the SoCo Art Market. More than 30 vendors will be present, including Austin Art Garage, SoLa and TOMS Shoes. Other attractions are the Hope Farmer’s Market, a 4G internet tent to check e-mail and Rock Island Hideaway. A taste of Austin is provided through locally grown cuisine, including gluten-free and vegan options. The Hideaway screens NFL and NCAA football games throughout the weekend on two 12 x 9 foot monitors. So if you are torn between watching College Game Day or your favorite band, you can do both while eating delicious food grown right here in Central Texas. Austin, quite possibly the most environmentally conscious city in Texas, boasts ACL as being “100 percent carbon neutral.” The festival is planned to eliminate waste and offset the concert goers’ individual emissions. Organizers encourage attendees to ride their bicycles or take the shuttle that  departs from 4th and Guadalupe. There is no parking offered at the event. Tickets for the main festival are officially sold out on the ACL website. Some may still be found online at such sites as ticketliquidator.com, ticketcity.com and craigslist.com.  However, those tickets are being sold far above face value. The Facebook page for ACL also has several networkers offering to sell their tickets to any interested individual. The official ACL website is still selling pre-show  as well as aftershow tickets for many different bands located at various venues around Austin. Senior nursing major Ellen O’Meara attended the event for the first time last year. “I fell in love,” she said. “They cater to every type of music-loving audience by getting performers from all different music genres.  Austin City Limits is a weekend full of great music, fun, and authentic Austin culture. If you haven’t experienced it, you need...

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Confidence is key for lady Crusaders
Oct05

Confidence is key for lady Crusaders

Written by Austin McCormick The women’s soccer team has been in preparation for a winning season since the beginning of the school year. The Lady Cru are striving for strong team unity and holding themselves to high expectations for their upcoming matches. Junior nursing major Erica Harris said, “Reaching the conference tournament is very important. Confidence is key for me in the games.” Head coach Meghann Brown guided the Cru women to a 12-6 overall record last year. Hard work paid off in the American Southwest Conference to set a record of 10-3 for the 2009 season. The UMHB women set school records for single-season victories along with most conference wins. Senior marketing major Kellee Shearer said, “We need to find motivation in the goals we will set weekly from now on. Confidence in me from my coach and teammates helps me to play well. We need to have more communication on the field between our teammates to keep each other up.” A big crowd excites the whole team from the start of a game. Loyal fans that cheer loudly make the squad feel that the school is behind them and boost the confidence of the team. The women have practice shirts that have the words “unity, respect, trust and integrity” across the front. The words represent what the team is pushing for its season to be successful. Freshman education major Laura Briner said, “I am always really aggresive on the field at practices and games.” Playing strong defense, keeping strong team unity and attacking the opponent are all important qualities for the team’s success this season. The upcoming soccer games are conference matches that need to be won in order for an invitation to the conference tournament. Winning the American Southwest Conference is an important stepping  stone to making it to the national tournament. Shearer said, “We are four games into conference play, and I know we are coming together as a team. Things are starting to look up for us. The team record is three wins, four losses and one tie. With only seven conference games remaining, the Lady Cru must stay focused and keep their eyes on the prize. Freshman accounting major Maizey Cardy said, “We have the ability  to make it to the tournament. It is just a matter of working together as a...

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Signs of Love helps Honduras
Oct05

Signs of Love helps Honduras

Written by Ashley Ramirez Vista Community Church of Belton, has partnered with Signs of Love to help the deaf and the sick in villages around Honduras. The church sent two teams to Honduras this summer. Temple College sophomore Jefte Campos went on the first trip in June. He said that Vista helps Signs of Love financially. They contribute to the gas used while Signs of Love drives throughout the country to help the deaf in surrounding villages. Vista also helps “aid the cause by sending people passionate about the ones who need love and help,” Campos said. Senior nursing major Sarah Herriott was also part of the medical team in June. She joined the group just days before plane tickets were purchased. A woman from the church approached her after hearing Herriott had an interest in going. “She knew I was a nursing major, and at that point they were looking for more medical people,” Herriott said. Her decision to go had to be made quickly because the down payment of $500 was due soon. Her financial needs to go were met. “The same afternoon that I dropped my check off for that, I got a check from my grandparents’ church for $500. Such awesome confirmation right there,” she said. Herriott believes God allowed her to learn and experience much of His beauty and power. “He taught me what it looks like to function as the body of Christ and how He can unify even the most diverse people to glorify His name,” she said. Herriott also saw a miraculous healing occur during her visit to the camp. A woman entered the clinic complaining about “swollen lymph nodes,” which was actually cancer. Herriott and two other team members prayed for the woman. One person anointed her with oil before praying for healing. Herriott said “We opened our eyes and the bump was significantly smaller. It was a miracle. It was huge.” Sophomore Shawn Cain went on the second trip to Honduras, where they served at a camp for the deaf. “Our purpose was to minister to the deaf of northern Honduras. We were to help, to serve, to teach language and most importantly to love,” he said. Cain enjoyed playing with the children. Two of the boys were Eduin and Felix. Cain thought of the children as his while he was there, “which means I was to make sure they were doing OK, staying out of trouble and enjoying themselves,” he said. As the team was leaving the camp, and after multiple hugs from the children, Cain looked out the window of the van and saw Eduin and Felix...

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