Danger at 9th and College

By Terryn Kelly If you are one of the many students who fear getting your legs knocked off while walking across campus streets, you are not alone. Although there is a speed limit while driving around on campus, it seems some drivers are going well above 30 mph. A dangerous intersection is at 9th and College streets. Where only stop signs and fading white stripes mark the crosswalks. Many universities have actual stop lights at such intersections to regulate traffic and provide a safer crossing. Yes, we were all taught in grade school to look both ways before crossing the street, but they never said what happens when you look both ways and a car still comes out of nowhere and nearly runs you over. Junior interdisciplinary studies major Charles Hitchens feels unsafe when using crosswalks. “At times I do not feel safe when I am walking because half of the time people do not look where they are going while driving. I would prefer the school look into getting stop lights,” he said. “I would have a security guard out directing traffic at all times. That way it will be safer for students to get across without interrupting traffic and for drivers to drive safely,” Hitchens said. Sophomore nursing major Shelby Ashley thinks that both pedestrians and drivers should be aware. “When driving through the intersections, I stop at the stop signs and look for pedestrians. If I see them, I’ll wave… them to go. I try not to be distracted when driving on campus because some people just don’t pay attention,” she said. “I almost hit a guy the other day because he just darted out on his bicycle from in between two cars in line at the stop sign. He put himself in a dangerous predicament by crossing somewhere other than a crosswalk,” Ashley said. She thinks the   problems at the crosswalk can be alleviated if people are educated on how to cross the street safely. Senior performance studies major Lauryn McCoy agrees that a stoplight should be put into place soon because there is great chance that an unfortunate accident will happen sooner or later. “All too often people wait too long to do something about traffic problems until someone is seriously hurt or injured. Why not take the steps now to prevent such a horrible thing from happening?” she asked. Stop lights or crossing guards would be a nice addition to the school crosswalks and would have an added element of...

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Chinese students show off culture

By Natasha Christian Dressed in fancy suits and traditional oriental clothing, Chinese students greeted American students in the Lord Conference center for China Night Oct. 7.  With a full Asian cuisine and videos shown throughout the night, locals embraced a new culture.  The event corresponds with China National Day, an Oct. 1 holiday honoring the country. The international students picked a day close to the festivity so their fellow Crusaders could mark the occasion with them. This was the first time China Night was held at UMHB, and the Chinese students hope to make it a tradition. Freshman business major Joy Zhang said, “We wanted to bring people together and celebrate this festival.”   The night began with a warm welcome and gratitude for those attending. The evening then led to a buffet of homemade Chinese dishes cooked by freshman biology major student Henry Zong. Candles lit the way to the array of food, including cookies with no flour and warm green tea waiting at the end. There were more attendees than food, which is a good problem to have. A shocked Zong did not realize several students planned to attend China night. He said, “I did not know so many people would come here.”    One of the entertaining challenges of the night was learning bits of Chinese. The Asian students demonstrated how to say phrases like “hello” and “how are you?” However, when UMHB students tried to repeat the same words, it was clearly not the same. Video clips following the lesson turned out to be the biggest hit of the night. One of them showed a man mysteriously switching masks at very fast speeds. The segment ended with a portion  of a Beijing Opera sung by a  fellow Chinese Cru member.  A melting pot began to occur as the Chinese students demonstrated a childhood game called Tiao Pi Jin.  It consisted of an elastic band wrapped around one leg of three players to form a triangle. Participants criss-crossed, jumped and twirled. The trick was not to touch the string. It looked easy but was not.  Three Chinese female students dressed in traditional costumes started a practice round and then asked for volunteers to join. With help from Easterners and encouragement from Westerners, participants got the technique down and then taught others. As a result, the activity was a great way for global     interaction. The pot continued stirring with show and tell. Chinese students displayed and explained East Asian artifacts. They included the bright floral decorative dresses called cheongsams and a comb made entirely out of an ox bone. In addition, the hosts of the night taught participants to...

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Golf defends with wins in both divisions
Oct18

Golf defends with wins in both divisions

By Jake Stamps The UMHB Fall Invitational was a huge win for the Lady Cru and Crusader golf teams. Both defended their golf course homes with wins in their division. New rankings from Golf World magazine, rated the Lady Cru No. 14 in the nation in the NGCA Top 25 D-III Poll. Head women’s golf Coach Darla Kirby said, “This is exciting, and we will be able to get to play against rival UT- Tyler in our next tournament.” UT-Tyler ranked one spot ahead of the Lady Cru in the poll. The women’s tournament was played at Wildflower Country Club in Temple where they posted a 15-stroke victory to win the team competition.   After the first day of competition, Kirby said, “It was awesome to be leading the tournament over high quality teams such as Texarkana Community College and Tyler Junior College because both schools are ranked high in the nation in their NCAA division.” The Lady Cru reached their goal by “doing better the first day,” Kirby noted. They improved the second day by one stroke to secure the UMHB Fall Invitational victory. Kelly Gonyea, the ASC Conference Player of the Week of Sept. 26-27 led the team. Gonyea, a sophomore accounting major, won the individual tournament by two strokes. “My teammates are awesome, and the team is the strongest I have seen at UMHB,” she said. Victoria Thane, Taylor O’Rear, Sara Eckert and others also contributed. Sophomore business administration major Eckert said, “Winning our last tournament was awesome because we were at our home course. We knew the course and how it would play, so we definitely had an advantage over the other teams.” Despite being already at the top of the conference, the team is young. It consists of four freshmen, three sophomores and one junior. Being young is not a bad thing with wins already under their belt, and fans may anticipate more good things to come to the Lady Cru’s future. The men’s team was also recognized in Golf World magazine’s NGCA Top 25 D-III Poll. In their tournament, which was held at Stonetree Golf Course in Killeen, the men won the D-III Division with a seven-stroke lead. Head men’s golf Coach Aaron Rodeffer said, “I am very pleased with being second overall only to be behind Tyler Junior College and winning the D-III Division.”  The Crusaders fell by two strokes in the overall division but were victorious in the D-III battle. Robby Schimmels, a sophomore accounting major, was awarded ASC Conference Player of the Week for Sept. 25-27 for his performance at the Invitational. Schimmels tied with fellow Crusader Bryce Myburgh for...

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Successful season continues for football
Oct18

Successful season continues for football

By Lindsey Holderby     While the weather may be cooling down, Cru football is just warming up for the rest of the season. After their 52-12 domination against Southern Oregon University Oct. 15, UMHB football remains undefeated with a 6-0 overall record and 4-0 in American Southwest Conference. Senior business management major and Crusader halfback Blake Dempsey said, “Our defense played amazing; our special teams started to really help us out and the offense realized some strengths and how we need to make some adjustments.” It is obvious how extraordinary the Cru’s defense played with Korey Steward recovering a 52-yard fumble, Javicz Jones making 11 tackles, two interceptions and blocking a punt, and Ty Dooley leading the game with 15 tackles. Geoff Myles returned a 72-yard punt for six points, LiDarral Bailey forced a touchdown from the one yard line, and Darius Wilson helped carry the game by running 100 yards. Sophomore physical therapy major and wdefensive back J.C. Hickman said, “My goal is to be a positive influence on the team and to achieve a national championship. If we don’t win nationals, it will be a disappointment.” Head Coach Pete Fredenberg and Dempsey hope that they will take home a national championship this year. Team captains Blake Dempsey, Tucker Glaske, Chris Brent and Javicz Jones helped lead the Cru to its current four rank in both the American Football Coaches Association and the DIII Football’s Top 25 Poll. Dempsey said, “Success chases hard work. Success may not always come when you want it, but if you work hard, it will come.” They can win their division even with a loss, but they are not even settling with winning the division. They have their eyes set on the top prize of a national championship. But one loss makes them ineligible for the title, so they hope not to let one game go. And which competitor are they most worried about? Head Coach Fredenberg said, “As cliche as it sounds, we are always worried about our next opponent. Everyone knows how good we are, so they all are going to play their best. So we have to be prepared to fight every week.” UMHB is known for its high performance standard in football. When players are recruited, they know expectations are high, so they have to be dedicated and give it their all every day. Players describe characteristics needed to be a good football player and win games as having the will to succeed, dedication, resiliency and of course, athletic ability. Dempsey said, “I feel like the leadership and bond between the players is really unique from other teams....

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Cru teams defeat state competition

By Jeremy Frazier While four students stood over a “dead body” in College Station, four others were displaying their craft of public speaking. The university’s Cru-Justice team won first place in the inaugural Crime Scene Interpretation Competition on Sept. 30. Secretary for the conference and UMHB criminal justice Professor Christine Nix explained the purpose of the contest. “It allows students to not only show what they learned academically but also integrated what they’ve learned and transferred into something other than writing skills.” Each team consisted of four members with a different task of working a “crime scene.” The scene was set up on a stage with a mannequin on the floor and a turned-over kitchen set. In the competition, each school had 30 minutes to interpret a mock scene. Senior criminal justice major Tommy Sirkis was the sketch artist for the UMHB team. “The competition was a great way to apply the information that is taught inside the classroom to possible real life experiences,” Sirkis said. Senior psychology major Lauren Rister handled the crime scene visitor’s log. She described how she felt when she learned they had won. “I was so excited I couldn’t believe all the competition. We represent the Southwestern Association of Criminal Justice,” she said. “The best part about being on the team is the learning experience and the bonding moment we had with each other on the ride there and back,” Rister said. The keyword for Cru-justice was unity. Senior criminal justice major Russell Davis explained the reason the team operated smoothly. “What made us a great team is that each person got to do what they wanted to do, and they enjoyed it.” Meanwhile in Kingwood, speech Professor Kathy Owens took her team to Lone Star College for a competition. Owens said the speech contests are not like athletic ones in terms of team size.  “We compete against UT-Austin’s 25 member team at every tournament.” Freshman mass communication/journalism major Jasmine Simmons placed seventh in dramatic interpretation. She praised her competitors, “It was wonderful seeing all the talented interpreters I was able to compete with.” Freshman mass communication/journalism major Lindsey Holderby is using the loss as a learning experience.  “You see all the different competitions and decide which ones you might want to do next tournament,” she said. Win or lose, both professors believe that building relationships and coming together as a team is a very important element. After many years of attending conferences, Nix said, “This is the most I’ve enjoyed a...

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