Successful season continues for football
Oct18

Successful season continues for football

By Lindsey Holderby     While the weather may be cooling down, Cru football is just warming up for the rest of the season. After their 52-12 domination against Southern Oregon University Oct. 15, UMHB football remains undefeated with a 6-0 overall record and 4-0 in American Southwest Conference. Senior business management major and Crusader halfback Blake Dempsey said, “Our defense played amazing; our special teams started to really help us out and the offense realized some strengths and how we need to make some adjustments.” It is obvious how extraordinary the Cru’s defense played with Korey Steward recovering a 52-yard fumble, Javicz Jones making 11 tackles, two interceptions and blocking a punt, and Ty Dooley leading the game with 15 tackles. Geoff Myles returned a 72-yard punt for six points, LiDarral Bailey forced a touchdown from the one yard line, and Darius Wilson helped carry the game by running 100 yards. Sophomore physical therapy major and wdefensive back J.C. Hickman said, “My goal is to be a positive influence on the team and to achieve a national championship. If we don’t win nationals, it will be a disappointment.” Head Coach Pete Fredenberg and Dempsey hope that they will take home a national championship this year. Team captains Blake Dempsey, Tucker Glaske, Chris Brent and Javicz Jones helped lead the Cru to its current four rank in both the American Football Coaches Association and the DIII Football’s Top 25 Poll. Dempsey said, “Success chases hard work. Success may not always come when you want it, but if you work hard, it will come.” They can win their division even with a loss, but they are not even settling with winning the division. They have their eyes set on the top prize of a national championship. But one loss makes them ineligible for the title, so they hope not to let one game go. And which competitor are they most worried about? Head Coach Fredenberg said, “As cliche as it sounds, we are always worried about our next opponent. Everyone knows how good we are, so they all are going to play their best. So we have to be prepared to fight every week.” UMHB is known for its high performance standard in football. When players are recruited, they know expectations are high, so they have to be dedicated and give it their all every day. Players describe characteristics needed to be a good football player and win games as having the will to succeed, dedication, resiliency and of course, athletic ability. Dempsey said, “I feel like the leadership and bond between the players is really unique from other teams....

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Cru teams defeat state competition

By Jeremy Frazier While four students stood over a “dead body” in College Station, four others were displaying their craft of public speaking. The university’s Cru-Justice team won first place in the inaugural Crime Scene Interpretation Competition on Sept. 30. Secretary for the conference and UMHB criminal justice Professor Christine Nix explained the purpose of the contest. “It allows students to not only show what they learned academically but also integrated what they’ve learned and transferred into something other than writing skills.” Each team consisted of four members with a different task of working a “crime scene.” The scene was set up on a stage with a mannequin on the floor and a turned-over kitchen set. In the competition, each school had 30 minutes to interpret a mock scene. Senior criminal justice major Tommy Sirkis was the sketch artist for the UMHB team. “The competition was a great way to apply the information that is taught inside the classroom to possible real life experiences,” Sirkis said. Senior psychology major Lauren Rister handled the crime scene visitor’s log. She described how she felt when she learned they had won. “I was so excited I couldn’t believe all the competition. We represent the Southwestern Association of Criminal Justice,” she said. “The best part about being on the team is the learning experience and the bonding moment we had with each other on the ride there and back,” Rister said. The keyword for Cru-justice was unity. Senior criminal justice major Russell Davis explained the reason the team operated smoothly. “What made us a great team is that each person got to do what they wanted to do, and they enjoyed it.” Meanwhile in Kingwood, speech Professor Kathy Owens took her team to Lone Star College for a competition. Owens said the speech contests are not like athletic ones in terms of team size.  “We compete against UT-Austin’s 25 member team at every tournament.” Freshman mass communication/journalism major Jasmine Simmons placed seventh in dramatic interpretation. She praised her competitors, “It was wonderful seeing all the talented interpreters I was able to compete with.” Freshman mass communication/journalism major Lindsey Holderby is using the loss as a learning experience.  “You see all the different competitions and decide which ones you might want to do next tournament,” she said. Win or lose, both professors believe that building relationships and coming together as a team is a very important element. After many years of attending conferences, Nix said, “This is the most I’ve enjoyed a...

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African concert rocks Hughes
Oct18

African concert rocks Hughes

By Katie Maze One Voice Choir performed for a full house Oct. 13 in Hughes Recital Hall. The performance provided the audience with diverse entertainment from the African culture and the opportunity to experience it firsthand. “I thought it was lovely,” said freshman pre-med biology major Kendrell Jackson. “I’m a big music person, so I love all the harmonies and drums. I like that I was able to get to see something new and different.” Accompanied by professor of performing and visual arts Dr. Stephen Crawford, the choir performed traditional songs and chants from various countries in Africa. Use of authentic instruments added to the ambiance inside the tiny theater. Singers stood semi-circle around Crawford as he played the kpanlogo drum, originally used by people in Ghana to communicate over long distances. He delivered a solo on the marimba, a wooden instrument prevalent in Africa. All music was created by African percussion instruments, most of which belong to Crawford’s personal collection. Both he and conductor Matt Crosby dressed in formal African robes called dashiki, normally worn by men on special occasions in Nigeria. “It was difficult to play one beat while singing along with another, but we wanted to use instruments and things that were authentic,” Crosby said. He encouraged audience members to stand and sing along with the choir, an element unique to this particular African installation. He said he wanted to take the listeners out of their comfort zone so that they could truly experience the music. “I didn’t want the  audience to just watch a formal concert. This is something that really has to be experienced outside the box in order to truly embrace the spirit of  African music,” Crosby said. Freshman music education major Amber Como, who attended the performance as a lab  requirement, said, “I like the originality and the fact that it incorporated the audience with the performance. That was my favorite part. This definitely didn’t feel like homework.” Crosby said he was inspired to celebrate African culture because of a few weeks he spent in Nigeria in 2005 teaching at the Nigerian Baptist Theological Seminary. He and Crawford joined forces last spring and began research on Africa’s music and culture. They worked together to combine the nature of freedom with modern Western elements to pay homage to the music’s colorful culture. “The rhythm and freedom they have really inspired me …. The spirit of the Nigerians is wonderful, and I really wanted to capture that. We’ve never done African music before, so it was time we experimented with it.” Crosby explained the impact studying African music has had on the members of...

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Edgar Allen Poe: topic of festival for poetry lovers

By Terryn Kelly For those who find delight in food, Edgar Allen Poe and Halloween costumes, this event is the perfect match. A Poe Fest, sponsored by the Sigma Tau Delta society will be held Oct. 28 at 7 p.m.  in the amphitheater on the corner of King Street and 9th. Assistant Professor and English Department Chair Dr. Jacky Dumas has been a part of the event since he came to the university. There is a learning factor behind the motivation for the bash.  “One of the goals of the Sigma Tau Delta society is to help promote literacy and a love of literature on campus. Although Poe’s birthday is later in the year, his style of writing fits Halloween really well. Traditionally, what we do are readings of Poe’s work, particularly The Raven, because that’s probably the most well known,” Dumas said. There will be some   changes added to the celebration. “This year we are going to have a literary contest and an art contest for poetry and artwork that is inspired by Poe’s writing. People will submit those selections to me; the deadline for that is Wednesday 26th. The Sigma groups will … pick the top two or three in each category. We will read those at the party,” he said. For students who like dressing up for Halloween, attending the Poe Fest should be fun. “We will also do a costume contest to fit with the Halloween theme, and it doesn’t have to be Poe related,” Dumas said. “Just come dressed as whatever you want to be dressed as. We also do a prize for best costume. Having the Poe Fest is a different way to get a major figure in literature out there but also celebrate the season in the same fashion.” Senior English major Lindsay Prater was inducted into Sigma Tau Delta last year. She enjoys helping with the event and putting the final, eerie touches on the Halloween decorations in the outdoor ampitheater. “We each come ensuring that we are spookily dressed, usually literary themed. Last year, I was the Phantom of the Opera. We decorate the amphitheater with dark décor and play spooky background music. The whole event is just a fun time to hang out in costume and be a bit of a literature nerd,” she said. Sophomore nursing major Linda Rubio had not heard of the Poe Fest until recently. She was surprised to learn that anyone interested in the event was welcome to attend. Not only can attendees learn about the famous writings of Poe, but there is also the potential to meet new people with whom they may...

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Footloose bursts back on the big screen with fans unsure of change

By Lauren Jones After hearing that the 1984 Footloose was remade, many refused to see it because some movies shouldn’t be touched. However, those who hadn’t seen the original were pleasantly surprised. The film, starring Kenny Wormald, Julianne Hough and Dennis Quaid, is a feel-good movie, and many who have seen it agree that those not wanting to see it should give it a chance. Footloose is the story of Ren McCormack (Wormald), a teen rebel from Boston who moves to the small town of Bomont to live with his aunt and uncle after his mother’s death. He quickly learns of the town’s strict laws; playing loud music and dancing is forbidden. The laws were established by Bomont city councilman and Reverend Shaw Moore (Quaid), whose son and four other teenagers were killed in a car accident after a night of drinking, playing loud music and dancing. Ren is frustrated by these rules but learns that he isn’t alone after meeting the reverend’s daughter. Ariel (Hough) is a troubled teen whose only dream is to leave Bomont. With the help of his friends Willard (Miles Teller) and Rusty (Ziah Colon), Ren challenges the laws and moves that the  prohibiting of public dancing be abolished. The acting is good and the movie is nearly identical to the original except for a few major parts (the scene where Ariel stands between two cars driving down a highway was cut), but many who have seen the first Footloose would agree that it just isn’t the same. It’s hard to judge characters in the new film without comparing them to the original actors. And while Wormald does a good job portraying Ren, most would agree he’s no Kevin Bacon. The dancing was choreographed well, although the style has been adapted for this generation and may not appeal to those who love the original. If you’ve never seen the 1984 Footloose, you may like the new version. Sophomore education major Niata Owens said, “I liked the storyline of it, and I liked the ending. It wasn’t what I expected, but it was still a really good movie.” Sophomore communication major Kent Franze was skeptical about seeing the film. “I went in thinking it wasn’t going to be good and that it was going to be corny and shame the original, but I left with a positive outlook,” he said. “I was happy with the movie overall.” After noting remakes that have been made this year, it seems the movie industry is running out of ideas. However, it’s no reason to write off a movie that may be better than you think.  Owens said, “Even if...

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