Third installment brings nightmare and horror lacking in rest of series

By Terryn Kelly The third installment of Paranormal Activity has arrived. This time, the camera documents young sisters Katie and Kristi as they come into contact with an evil entity for the first time. The prequel allows the audience to see why the entities continue to plague the sisters when they reach adulthood. This installment differs from the previous two sequels in many ways. The scares come sooner, and there are also some funny scenes. The climax does not hit until the end of the movie, which is where the trailer says “The last 15 minutes will change your life forever.” The movie was produced for an estimated $5 million. In its opening week, it managed to accumulate $54 million, which beat the sequel Paranormal Activity 2 last October. The movie is rated “R” and lots of children without their parents or without an ID saying they were 17 or older were being turned away in large groups. Many said that in the previous movies, it had taken too long to get to the main point of the movie or for the scary parts to take place. It seems as though the writers have taken note of what the moviegoers’ complaints were. Within the first 30 minutes of viewing the film, screams could be heard throughout the movie theater, and the plot quickly began to take place. Little sister Katie played by actress Chole Csengery is the first to come into contact with the evil entity Toby. The writers play with the idea that smaller children are more prone to seeing ghosts  such as in Insidious. Katie is somewhat brave through the entire movie and does not seem to be bothered by the entity at the beginning. Her big sister Kristi played by actress Jessica Tyler Brown also experiences the entity in different ways, and Toby is not fond of her. After some unnerving nights in the house, the family decides to stay with the grandmother in hopes of being removed from the hauntings, although is not help. Even though Paranormal Activity 3, just as the ones before, doesn’t possess all of the special effects or copious amounts of gore, it still manages to be one of the scariest movies I’ve seen all year. The movie allows the audience to sit and wait in anticipation about what they think may happen next. Junior cell biology major John Mabane said, “A good aspect of the movie was the element of surprise.” The end of the movie is truly a surprise. Those who thought it would end in the same way Paranormal Activity 2, were wrong. The writers Christopher B. Landon...

Read More

Modern Warfare 3: Coming soon to game centers

By Jake Stamps Gamers across the country may not be in class next week due to the new release of Infinity Ward’s along with Sledgehammers Games’ new Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. Nielsen’s Top 20 Games to Watch rates this as “the most anticipated game” of the 2011 holiday season. The game will hit shelves Nov. 8. The story line takes place where Modern Warfare 2 left off, trying to prevent World War III. As the campaign begins, the war starts and expands into countries all over Europe. England, France and Germany are some of the locations where crucial battles will take place. The two other game types will be returning as well: Special Ops and multiplayer. Special Ops will be back with new content containing maps, missions and levels to unlock. Senior finance major Ramon Aguirre shares his opinion about the game. “I like the campaign and Special Ops, but what keeps me playing is the multiplayer game style. I love the competition that exists as well as being able to play with friends.” The multiplayer game has been revamped into a new style of play with new game types, kill streaks and perks. It will also feature the beloved zombie game. The gamer will have the option of having kicks, focus and attachments that will be added when a player progresses in ranks and kills. These features will make the game more realistic as a player shoots a gun. Long lines are sure to form at local Walmarts, Best Buys, GameStops and other stores by Nov. 8 as fans try to be first for the next chapter in their Call of Duty series. Sophomore pre-physical therapy major Michael Teague will attend the midnight premiere of the game at Walmart. “I’m not what you’d call a big-time gamer, but I am a huge fan of the Call of Duty series. You can bet I’ll be getting Modern Warfare 3 as soon as it comes out,” he said. Sophomore accounting major Andrew Berg already purchased his game in advance at GameStop. “Once I found out about the game, I went to GameStop and pre-ordered it. I cannot wait to play it. The Modern Warfare series is my favorite,” he said. Along with the release of Modern Warfare 3, is the opportunity to subscribe to Call of Duty: Elite. There is a fee as well as paid Web based service that allows players to look at their statistics in various ways. Also included is a video community that will allow them to share and view game clips and compete to win in-game and real life prizes. The local Belton...

Read More

Zombie apocalypse is real on “Dead”

By Katie Maze Imagine Atlanta abandoned and overrun with drooling freaks hell-bent on eating human flesh. This is reality for the survivors of the zombie apocalypse in the TV show The Walking Dead. After narrowly escaping a fiery death at the CDC last season, Sheriff’s Deputy and protagonist Rick Grimes decides to move his group of survivors. His wife and son, other families and stragglers who have no one left, are a group of survivors transitioning from    Atlanta to Fort Benning. Where there are rumors of a colony providing protection and shelter. “I’m so excited to see what is going to happen this season,” junior nursing major Kara Cornelio said. “When I watch it, I feel like I’ve stepped into another world that feels so real…and they have really good zombies.” Two days after the escape from CDC, the convoy’s power source, a rusty Winnebago, breaks down at the foot of an abandoned traffic jam. A gridlock in   summer heat provides the perfect setting for tempers to boil and plot to unfold. While searching through automobiles for supplies and clearing the road, a hoard of zombies approaches. Thinking quickly, Grimes tells everyone to hide underneath the stranded cars. Just as they thought all of the “walkers” had passed, a rogue zombie attacks 12-year-old Sophia. Instinctively, she runs into the nearby woods to escape. Apparently, managing relationships, maintaining sanity and closeting affairs is complicated in the midst of a zombie apocalypse. Sophia’s disappearance is the perfect catalyst for rising tension of how to search for her and whether or not they should be searching at all because it threatens the safety of the group by making it a stagnant target. The search leads to a church where the search party questions the meaning of life during the apocalypse. After, of course, killing a few zombies. “You really start to see the human side of the characters in this first episode,” Cornelio said. “Anybody can make a zombie movie, but the deeper meaning is what makes the show so good.” As the incredible circumstance that brought this group of people together would have it, the episode ends when Grimes’ son Carl is struck by a bullet that passed through a deer. In episode two, Otis, the shooter, leads Grimes and his wounded son to a farmhouse where a veterinarian and his family are Carl’s only chance of survival. Shane, in a desperate attempt to reconcile his standing within the group, volunteers to run to an infested FEMA shelter where there are surgical tools the veterinarian needs to save Carl. If opinions about Shane from season one were muddled, the last scene...

Read More

Wind Ensemble enchants audience

By Lauren Jones Audience members sat eagerly as they waited for the Wind Ensemble to take the stage in Walton Chapel Oct. 24. At 7:30 p.m., members walked onto the stage, sat in their seats and waited for the cue from conductor Nils Landsberg. With a wave of his baton, Landsberg signaled the ensemble to play the first notes of a piece titled “Resonances I.” The chapel was quickly filled with a melodious sound generated by trumpets, clarinets, trombones, flutes, saxophones and many other instruments. Audience members were moved by the piece’s long, harmonious notes that layered deep, solid bass with bright, warm trumpets. At the end of the piece, the audience cheered with approval and knew that the rest of the concert would be filled with music that was just as beautiful as the opening piece. The ensemble’s second piece, “Bayou Breakdown,” was a reflection of the music of New Orleans. Its lively beat and jazzy flair took the audience on a tour of the bayous of Louisiana. Sophomore art major and member of the ensemble, Angela Sanchez, enjoyed performing the piece. “I really liked ‘Bayou Breakdown,’” she said. “It was interesting. It was fast, and it was upbeat.” The ensemble then played a beautiful Aaron Copeland piece, “Down a Country Lane.” Its use of flutes and clarinets make the piece moving and uplifting, and even members of the ensemble appeared to be playing each note with feeling. As the applause subsided, a special guest was asked to come on stage. Michelle Palmer, an instructor of clarinet at UMHB and principal clarinetist of the Temple Symphony Orchestra, joined the students in performing the arrangement “Black Dog,” a piece mimicking the musical style of Led Zeppelin and the guitar riffs of Jimi Hendrix. Palmer’s clarinet solos sounded similar to the guitar solos performed by classic rock bands, and the audience could almost feel the electric current in the air. Landsberg said Palmer’s performance was phenomenal. “We’re very fortunate to have Michelle Palmer on our faculty here, and getting to showcase her and work with her has been a real treat for our students,” he said. The ensemble then performed what was arguably one of the most beautiful arrangements of the night. “Be Thou My Vision” showcased the group’s ability to take an old classic and make it their own. The piece was dedicated to ensemble member Christine Marrero, who was unable to attend the performance. Another special guest  then joined the group.  William S. Carson, director of bands at Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is responsible for co-editing the last piece of the evening. The ensemble performed “Spoon River”...

Read More

Game six proves turning point for Texas Rangers’ loss

By Brett Land Heartbreaking. After 162 games, an exciting postseason run and one of the most historic World Series in the life of baseball, the Texas Rangers could almost feel the weight of the championship trophy in their arms. However, they came home with nothing more than sore muscles and regrets. Going into the 2011 World Series, the Rangers and their loyal fans were ready to finish the job they left undone at last year’s fall classic when they lost to the San Francisco Giants in six games. It was time for redemption. “We were so excited last year and didn’t know what we were capable of doing in the Series,” Rangers president and owner Nolan Ryan said in an interview with ESPN. “This year we’re more focused and more determined because we came away a little disappointed.” The hard-hitting Rangers began the series splitting the opening two games in St. Louis. A slow start left the Rangers with a 3-2 loss in game one. A late rally capped off the 2-1 win in game two and tied the series at one game each. Texas Ranger fans everywhere will agree that the 16-7 loss in game three is nothing to be discussed. Albert Pujols crushed 3 homeruns and countless hearts that Saturday night. In both the fourth and fifth games, just four runs proved to be enough for the Rangers to get two victories and take the series lead. One more win and “We are the Champions” would be playing in Arlington. Players and fans alike dreamed of lifting up the trophy and bringing it back to Texas. Then game six happened. It proved to be the turning point of the World Series. With a combined five errors, the game started off sloppy but ended up being one of the most unbelievable and unfortunately, unforgettable games of all time. Texas went into the bottom of the ninth inning with a 5-3 lead. With two runners on and two outs and a full count for Cardinals outfielder, David Freese, the Rangers were one strike, one fly ball or one ground ball and throw to first base away from the Championship. One out. That’s all. David Freese knocked in two RBIs with a triple to right field and tied the game. Extra innings, sports fans. The Rangers quickly bounced back when Josh Hamilton hit a two-run homerun in the top of the tenth. His first home run in almost 100 at-bats. This was the Rangers story book ending, right? Wrong. With two outs and a full count in the bottom of the tenth, Lance Berkman hit an RBI single to center...

Read More
Page 29 of 68« First...1020...2728293031...405060...Last »