Young and hungry roster will lead Lady Cru
Nov15

Young and hungry roster will lead Lady Cru

By Spencer Turner When the team takes to the court Nov. 18 for its opening contest of the 2011-12 campaign, it will boast a roster rich in talent and potential but short in collegiate experience.  A total of 11 freshmen join a squad that witnessed five of its members graduate last May. Amid this new infusion of youth, however, the Lady Cru remain confident as the new season approaches. “We believe we have a shot at the conference championship,” said seven-year Head Coach Kim Kirkpatrick-Thornton. “We realize they’re lofty, but we work towards the small goals first and build upward. The greatest goal is to learn to play to our potential all the time, no matter who we face.” Kirkpatrick-Thornton also stressed the team’s desire to earn a berth in the Division III championship tournament in March. Junior nursing major Brandy Dittert is one of seven starters returning from the previous year’s squad.  Sidelined by an injured anterior crucial ligament in the beginning weeks of last season, she is eager for the Lady Cru to put their first-round exit from the American Southwest Conference tournament behind them. “For the talent we had, it was not the finish we had in mind,” she said. “It wasn’t easy to sit through.” Dittert expressed the same eagerness to become a team leader. “I’m an upperclassman, and now it’s my turn to fill the leadership role,” she said. “It’s nerve racking, but I want to be in that position.” Senior interdisciplinary studies major Miranda Shorter, a four-year veteran of the program, voiced similar excitement in providing guidance to her younger teammates throughout the upcoming season. “I like being in that role,” she said.  “I’ve had good role models before me on the team to look up to.” Both returning starters understand from firsthand experience the steep learning curve younger members of the team must negotiate. “You can’t expect freshmen to know what it’s like to play college teams right away,” Shorter said. “They’ll get it, though. We’ve all been there, and we know what it’s like. The biggest key is working together as a team and getting them into our style (of basketball).” Despite the lineup’s shortage of collective playing time, Dittert and Shorter emphasized the competitiveness and versatility that define the group. “There’s such a variety of players; everyone can contribute in so many ways,” Dittert said. “Our team has people with the biggest heart for the game.” Shorter said, “The (freshmen) will be good. All the returners have such confidence in them.” Kirkpatrick-Thornton  praised the diligence, hustle and coachable demeanor exhibited by each player on and off the court. “This may...

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United Way, a different way to serve
Nov15

United Way, a different way to serve

For students interested in cultivating and improving Belton, the campus chapter of United Way of Central Texas may be what they are looking for. Mary Beth Kelton, a graduate student studying for a master’s in business, is Marketing and Communications Coordinator for the organization. “We are a safety net for the local community,” she said. “United Way of Central Texas agencies provide aid in family, crisis, support, youth and specialized services.  Each year it funds 27 local social service agencies that provide over 200,000 services to our family, neighbors and friends.” The agency focuses on long-term results rather than quick fixes. “We work together with the community to find lasting solutions to better people’s lives. We do that through promotion of education and common health,” Kelton said. “Without a good education, you can’t get a good job to help provide for your family. Without a good job, you don’t get good health care.” Freshman psychology and Christian ministry major Krystal Draper is president of the group. Upon arriving on campus, she was overcome by all of the ways to serve, but after searching, United Way seemed to be the perfect fit for her. “When I got here … it was so overwhelming because there were so many different things to get plugged into,” Draper said. What initially attracted her to the United Way group was its openness. “I liked that it is just so up in the air, and we really are trusting God to move forward in it. It’s so new, and we want to do so much and have people that really like being involved. It really gives you a voice about what you want to do and how you want to serve,” she said. Freshman international business major Seth Stephens operates as treasurer for the branch on campus. The opportunity to not only build relationships with the younger children, but to also be a role model to them  appealed to Stephens. “One of the things we are doing, is there is Wildcat mentor program in Temple where you go and be a mentor for a fifth-grade student. That really appealed to me because I have done that before,” he said. A community­-wide coat drive will be held Nov. 18 at Bodega Bean from 7-10 p.m. “Bring coats,” Stephens said. Students interested in joining can contact Kelton at 254-778-8616. Kelton said, “I felt it was very important for students here to get involved because there is already such a base for serving on campus. I wanted them to be involved with United Way. It is a great way to serve. The university already had a serving mentality,...

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SUB now keeps later hours, offers better Wi-Fi access

By Jake Stamps The SUB is now open 24/7 as of Oct. 31. Students will have more reliable Wi-Fi access as well as the option to hang out with friends or study in the early morning hours. With the help of the Student Government Association and Vice President for Student Life Dr. Bryon Weathersbee, a bill was passed to have the SUB open around the clock. “This will allow students to have a place to go, but students still need to be responsible and take care of the area. Be the school’s eyes,” Weathersbee said. As the news hit campus, students were happy with the decision. Sophomore Spanish major Collin Davies is a member of the university’s Student Government Association. “This change is the result of students expressing their desires to SGA and letting us take initiative and explore the routes necessary to accomplish the goal,” he said. This is a great example for students to learn how they can influence decisions on campus.” Sophomore accounting major Katie Fuqua pulled an all-night study session with friends. “We had an exam the following day, and we needed to make sure we would get an A. We all met up and studied till around 5 a.m. We then went to Starbucks right before the test. It was one long night, but we all passed, so it was definitely worth it,” she said. Sophomore education major Jordyn Russell and junior nursing major Whitney Almond agreed that the new hours will help not only them but other students as well. “Since the SUB will now be open at all hours, it will be more convenient for students to have somewhere to go after the library closes. The SUB is also a really good place to go, whether it’s to get together to study or to just hang out. I have hung out at the SUB before and plan to go back more often with these new hours,” Russell said. Almond agrees. “This is great for everyone and will allow people to hang out at all times. This will also allow everyone to have better access to socialize and/or study,” she said. Freshman business management major T.J. Kittrell also likes the new hours and easy Internet accessibility. “I will enjoy having the SUB open 24/7 because it will not only give me a better opportunity but other students a place to talk to friends or study. Having this new schedule will help everybody because it will allow those students who have conflicts with their schedule a chance to go to the SUB,” he said. “The SUB is also a great place for reliable Wi-Fi....

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Second ‘Highways’ rocks Hughes
Nov15

Second ‘Highways’ rocks Hughes

By Terryn Kelly The Schade Tree band, featuring art department Chair Hershall Seals, kicked off the Highways and Byways concert, performing an array of unique songs accompanied by soulful voices and acoustics. This was the second show in the concert series, which took place in Hughes Recital Hall Nov. 12. The concerts allow people from all walks of life to come together and experience different genres of music. Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts Ted Barnes said, “What we would like to do is try and bring traditional music to the campus in all kinds of various forms.” There was a small but enthusiastic crowd filled with older faces. Some clapped along to the music while others sang aloud. Barnes said, “The community in general has been a pretty good turnout. We certainly want more student participation. The reaction to the concert series campus wide has not been as big a turnout as we would like. We would like to give back a little more and give something for the students to do.” Barnes added that considering students’ budgets are often tight, the concert would be a fun campus event for them to attend for free and learn about traditional United States music locally. When searching for talent to bring to the school, Director of the Conservatory of Music Jonathan Gary uses different avenues to accomplish the task at hand. He said, “I will do my best to attend different venues especially in the Austin area, and I also do a lot of research online listening to recordings of performers. I get recommendations for other booking agencies, and we try to choose performers that can offer a variety of styles throughout the year.” Darcy Deville is a solo performer and a member of the Austin Lounge Lizards, a well-known group in Texas. She is also a part of Woody Says, which is a musical that tells the story of Woody Gutherie’s life and music. She just returned from touring in England with the Woody Says group, and they are up for a prestigious award in England similar to the Grammy Awards  in America. Deville performed many songs she wrote during the concert, and afterwards she shared which songs were featured on her CD. The crowd was informed of the history of the small guitar she played, whose fingerboard was originally made for Mick Jagger. Another artist appeared onstage alongside Deville named Jane Gillman. The two have worked in the music circuit for  over 15 years. Gillman’s favorite song of the night that she performed was titled “Elsa’s Tune.” She said, “The song was inspired by my...

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CruSibs: Campus’ new siblings
Nov15

CruSibs: Campus’ new siblings

By Halley Harrell There’s a new kind of Crusader on campus this year: the CruSib. The definition of a CruSib is a student whose sibling is attending or has also attended the university. In many cases, the sibling sets are made up of an upperclassman or alumnus and their younger sister or brother who chooses the same school. This year the numerous siblings coined the term “CruSibs” as several freshmen joined their siblings at college. Junior Christian ministry major Ryan Murphy created a group on Facebook to help the CruSibs keep up with one another. The siblings also use the hashtag #crusibs when tweeting about each other. The first of his siblings to attend here, Ryan learned about the school from a friend. “I visited here back when Hurricane Ike hit Houston,” he said. “I saw the campus and felt a peace from God that this was where I was supposed to go.” As Ryan’s younger sister decided to join the Crusader family, he was supportive. “I could see her going here,” he said. “As a big brother, it was nice knowing that I could be there for her as she’s adjusting to college life.” Freshman education major Lauren Murphy came to visit her brother a lot and ultimately fell in love with the campus. “I was set on staying home a year, but then towards the end of senior year, I decided to come here,” she said. “I wanted to come to a smaller university, and it’s not too far from home. I just love it.” While the Murphys are enrolled at the same time, other CruSibs have paved the way and graduated before their younger siblings’ arrival. Sophomore exercise sport science major Bailey Burks is the youngest of three, and the third of the Burks children to attend the university. Her older brother and sister are alumni. Bailey grew up watching how much they loved being part of the Cru. “My brother is ten years older than me, and my sister is eight years older,” Bailey said. “I didn’t really apply to anywhere else. When I was helping my brother and sister move onto campus, I just knew that I was going to go here.”   Though Bailey’s siblings both graduated several years before she arrived, she said that seeing them enjoy the Crusader lifestyle influenced her decision to follow in their footsteps. While Bailey was inspired to attend Mary Hardin-Baylor by her brother and sister, freshman English major Kathryn Pasichnyk said she tried not to consider family ties when choosing a college. Kathryn’s sister Lizzy is two years older, and picked the school because of its...

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