Intramural sports expands to esports

By Ashley Kizer Contributing Writer As soon as universities realized that COVID-19 would have an impact on intramural sports, many employees and student staff members had to branch out and find new ways to make intramurals available. With the rules of social distancing and mask wearing, it became clear that many traditional intramural sports were not going occur. However, because of technology and many students’ love for online sports, recreation departments have implemented online gaming, or esports, into intramural leagues. At UMHB, Campus Recreation staff member Hannah Zbylot said that UMHB was no exception.  “It has been challenging working this semester because of people’s response to the virus,” Zbylot said. “No one wants to spread their germs, so we’ve had to cut back in some of the intramural sports that are usually our largest competitions.” UMHB and other universities like the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M University have still been able to provide some physical intramural sports such as volleyball, disc golf, ultimate frisbee, kickball, and tennis. While there is still a variety, this is a limited batch of sports being offered compared to a normal intramural season. Additionally, playing any of the sports comes with the mask-wearing of the pandemic. Texas A&M Molly Lindner found it difficult to wear a mask while playing intramural softball. “It is actually super strange because you don’t realize how much you read people’s faces until you can’t see them anymore,” Lindner said. For that reason, among others, UMHB and other universities have implemented online gaming as a way for students to play intramural sports. Texas A&M offers MLB, NHL, and FIFA for intramural leagues. University of Texas at Austin offers Madden, NBA, and FIFA. UMHB offers Call of Duty, Rocket League, FIFA, and Super Smash Bros. Each school has different requirements for online gaming, but one commonality between all three is that the students compete in these online games in their own homes using their own gaming consoles. It is important to note that UT and Texas A&M both require students to pay a $10 fee to participate, but UMHB does not. Mark Gonzalez is currently participating in Intramural esports at UMHB. “I really appreciate how UMHB tried something new with intramurals this year,” Gonzales said. “It’s really cool to see them give us different options in the midst of the pandemic.” Gonzales also added that he felt UMHB has added different and unique sports to reach a broad range of students. Universities like UMHB have faced the challenge of COVID-19 head-on and quickly accommodated students with sports they like and online games they enjoy. These schools may keep...

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MEW with Shane & Shane, prayer and inspiration

By Jillian Steen Contributing Writer L-R: Zoe Elledge, Shane Everett, Shane Bernard, Ruth Lawson, and Shara McClure pose for a group photo before the Shane & Shane worship concert in Crusader Stadium on September 29, 2020. Photo by Jason Palmer. The annual Missions Emphasis Week each fall at UMHB allows student participation and the opportunity to hear from missionaries about their work and experiences locally and around the world. Students get to listen for their possible calling in missions and take steps towards incorporating a missions mindset into their everyday life. This year’s theme was “Reaching the Unreached.” The graphics read “Un-reached” with the letters “Un” being crossed out. This symbolized the goal that the MEW committee wanted to communicate, according to sophomore Christian studies major Ruth Lawson, one of the directors for MEW 2020. The inspiration comes from Isaiah 49:6, which states: “It is too small a thing for you to be my servant to restore the tribes of Jacob and bring back those of Israel I have kept. I will also make you a light for the gentiles, that my salvation may reach to the ends of the earth.” Lawson said that the message pertains very widely to people right here in our vicinity as well as to people who may be in remote places around the globe. “The unreached in the theme does not only represent the people that have never heard the gospel on this earth,” Lawson said. “There are many people now because of COVID that feel unreached and we wanted to hit on that too.” The week traditionally is scheduled with events and seminars where approximately 50 missionaries are able to engage with students in fellowship and conversations that often explain what it takes to be involved in missions. However, this year, in order to maintain safety,  missionaries were not allowed onto campus so the missions committee tied together several events for the week: a Shane & Shane concert, a visit at chapel by missions pastor René Maciel, a Market Night on King Street, and a time of reflection called “Slow Down.” Mid-week had René Maciel, the missions pastor of First Woodway Baptist Chruch in Waco,  speaking at Walton Chapel. There he  talked about “living missionally” every day. To emphasize prayer with Slow Down, students got involved by coming to the Quad on-campus between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. to spend time in the Lord’s presence and reflect. This event  was inspired by the resting incorporated into daily schedules in other cultures that are typically less hurried than Americans’ schedules. This challenged students to slow down and listen to the Lord’s voice. Market...

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Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB
Nov05

Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB

Elizabeth Franklin is crowned Miss MHB at Walton Chapel on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020 as previous Miss MHB winner Molly Rodeffer applauds at right. Photo by Gavin Green By Reagan Murr Elizabeth Franklin won the Miss MHB 2020-2021 title at Walton Chaple on Halloween night, Saturday, Oct. 31. She was crowned at a unqiue Miss MHB pageant with social distancing in place. Franklin, a junior psychology major from Georgetown represented the student recruiting organization Search CRU. For 50 years, the annual Miss MHB pageant provided young female students at UMHB the chance to show off their talents while advocating for causes that are important to them, and make new friends.  Even with the challenges that COVID-19 presents, the pageant continued to play a vital role on UMHB’s campus this year. “It’s a chance to get to know people and be silly and dance,” said senior Miss MHB contestant Alissa Edgington.  “[Miss MHB] is a chance to meet new people and get yourself out of your comfort zone.” Kaysie Sparks, a former Miss MHB contestant, directed this year’s pageant.  Sparks’ experience as a participant created a desire to put her own spin on the event. As director, she was responsible for getting the contestants ready for their pageant performances. “People all the time think that we just throw the girls on stage and this is all stuff they do on their own, but we practice three times a week from 5:45 to 9 o’clock,” said Sparks. This training begins about a month and a half before the actual show. “We go over every detail of pageant with them,” Sparks said. “We practice anything from walking in heels to how they’re going to give their platform speech to the judges. They kind of do everything.” Eunice Michaelson, who participated in last year’s pageant, expressed how intimidating being the pageant can be at first. “It’s almost like syllabus week,” Michaelson said. “You’re taking it all in, and that’s kind of how the first week of pageant is.  [There’s] this long list of things to do, and it can feel overwhelming.” But Michaelson also said that once practices began, it felt much more manageable.  “It grew to be this really comfortable thing where we all knew each other, we all got comfortable with each other’s talent,” Michaelson said.  “We just kind of formed this bond.” Elizabeth Franklin was crowned Miss MHB on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Photo by Gavin Green An article in The Bells, “Miss Search Cru wins Miss MHB 2020” by Destinee Reinauer, highlighted the camaraderie of the girls as the pageant winner, Molly Rodeffer, was announced last year.  The goal...

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Three tips for incoming freshmen

By C.J. Halloran College is a scary and exciting time in every high school graduate’s life. Independence, the new friends, and the new classes can all make or break a college student’s experience. Coming from high school, college can present itself as an unexplored land of opportunities. In order to get the best out of these opportunities, finding a guide or at least some advice is an absolute must. These are three tips that might be helpful: 1. Beware of Procrastination Unlike in high school, nobody is here to push you or make sure all your work is done. It can become very easy to completely forget about homework and spend all your time with your friends or at different activities. Your professors will not let you know when things are due, they just assume you know based on the syllabus and website, so it is imperative that you organize your time properly and stay on task. “Coming into college, I wish I would have known that procrastination would be my biggest enemy.” Junior Marissa Zermeno’s words seem simple and may sound like a repetition of what your parents have said in the past, but they ring true. 2. Partake in Campus Events One of the hardest things to do when you first arrive at college is to make friends. Getting paired with a roommate you have never met before, in a hall of people you know nothing about, can be intimidating when you first arrive. The best way to make friends during that first day on campus is to sign up for Welcome Week. UMHB’s Welcome Week was created with the intention of drawing new students close to each other and having them begin making a community of people that they could see themselves hanging out with for the rest of their college careers. But new events arise after Welcome Week and throughout the semester and year, so consider attending new functions, activities, and student association or club meetings, even if they are only online during the pandemic. 3. Budget Your Food Money Regardless of how good the cafeteria food is, as a college student you will always be tempted to go off campus for food. Maybe the cafeteria is not open, maybe it is, and you just do not want what they serve that day. That temptation to go out and get some food with friends will always be there. Going every so often is not a bad idea, but every student needs to mind their food budget, because the threat of going broke by eating off campus is real.  If you decide against going to the...

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Safe Return to Campus Plan for Fall 2020

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor has a Safe Return to Campus Plan posted on its website that addresses safety in nine key areas, each with information that can be found on the umhb.edu website, in a purple box at the lower left of the page. The areas of interest address safety within academics, student life, student services, student housing, athletics, and dining services. They also highlight cleaning protocols, health and safety protocols, the mandatory reporting of symptoms of exposure, and there is a section where student notices addressing these issues can be downloaded. The topic on academics explains the CRUflex plan of content delivery and teaching this fall semester that offers students three different options for participation and learning. CRUflex has already begun to offer students the opportunity to attend class, and/or attend online synchronously, or to attend asynchronously online. The academics topic also discusses the computers required and the safe use of them, and lets students know that in some cases, specific lab instructions and protocols are provided in class.  This section also lists the general safety protocols for being physically on campus, and interacting with fellow students and professors. These protocols, guided by CDC guidelines (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), involve using masks, staying at a safe social distance, and the section specifically addresses when masks and face coverings are required, as follows:   Student Health and Safety Protocols All UMHB community members are required to properly wear face coverings or face masks: Upon entering all campus buildingsIn all common areas and shared environments on campus, including hallways, restrooms, elevators, or university-provided group transportation (i.e. vans).When entering/exiting classrooms and lecture halls andFor students, throughout the duration of the class, lab, clinical activity, etc. Faculty must wear a mask until everyone is seated and properly socially distanced in class. So as to assist in communication with the class, faculty may or may not elect to wear a mask while they are teaching. Students and employees are typically not required to wear face coverings in outdoor areas of the campus, as long as at least 6 ft. social distancing is maintained. Students are required to furnish their own face coverings or face masks that conform to CDC guidelines; plan to bring at least two to campus. Hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes will be available in all classrooms, labs and on-campus clinical areas. All students must sanitize hands upon entering a classroom. Students who do not comply with health and safety protocols in the face-to-face class classroom, lecture hall, labs, or clinical areas will be required to leave the academic activity immediately. Disciplinary action may be imposed by the Dean...

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