Kristi Hofferber speaks out against abortion in all forms
Jan29

Kristi Hofferber speaks out against abortion in all forms

By Sarah Norrell Sobs were heard as Kristi Hofferber and a woman hugged and prayed together. Hofferber had just finished giving her testimony in Wednesday’s chapel service. Her unique story afforded students the chance to experience hope, even when dealing with horrendous circumstances. “God is here today,”  Dr. George Loutherback said. “He’s right over there,” he added, pointing at Hofferber, who was visiting with students. As a child born from rape and incest, Hofferber has spent her whole life dealing with her adoption. Now, she shares the story with audiences across the nation hoping to reach other adoptees or anyone considering abortion. “Each adoptee experience is something different,” Hofferber began. “I’m not going to be defined by my DNA. Yes, it’s there, but I know I’m God’s child; God called me to life. God is my creator, and He ordained me to life.” Hofferber always knew she was adopted. Despite her parents’ consistent offers, she never wanted to know about her biological parents. But that changed while on her way to New Orleans for a mission trip five years ago when a traveling companion mentioned having an abortion. Hofferber went to her parents, who explained what they knew: her biological mother had been raped by her father, Hofferber’s biological grandfather, when she was 16 years old. When her mother was 15, she miscarried, then Hofferber was conceived, born and put up for adoption. Following Hofferber, her mother was forced by her father to terminate four more pregnancies by abortion. Hofferber knew she needed to try to find her mother and fill the void in her life to begin to heal. With only a name, she spent two days searching through social media before finding her mother and contacting her. Hofferber found her biological mother and half sister, who was expecting a son. At the request of her mother, she went to visit for a weekend. “Here I am driving two states away to meet her for the very first time, and I can tell you that was a weekend I’ll never forget,” Hofferber said. “We shared a lot that weekend, a lot of emotions. It, of course, wasn’t easy for her because of the situation, but it wasn’t easy for me either.” With difficulty, her mother began to explain the circumstances surrounding Hofferber’s birth, but she was stopped. “I just looked at her and said ‘I already have an idea, and I love you. It doesn’t change anything for me,’” Hofferber said. Since then, she has continued a relationship with her mother. “Her testimony was really touching, and I felt moved by her courage to travel around and share...

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Texas teams in close quarters within division
Nov16

Texas teams in close quarters within division

By Cody Weems It’s no secret that Texas is a football state. However, all three of the state’s NBA teams are looking to make Texas a force to reckon with in the basketball landscape. The three division foes are set to battle it out for a spot atop the Southwestern Division of the Western Conference. The ageless Spurs are favored by many to repeat as division champions, but the biggest question mark the team faces is whether or not players can stay healthy for an entire season. Guard Manu Ginobili, who missed significant time last season with a broken hand, was already sidelined for the first two games due to a back injury. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich has said he intends to limit the playing time of 36-year-old Tim Duncan, but as he told ESPN’s Andrew McNeill, Duncan has an ability to make the most of his minutes. “It’s just a credit to his professionalism, his character, his understanding of the human body and that there are only so many steps and years you have,” Popovich said. “He’s taken the best advantage he possibly can to extend that as long as he can.” San Antonio made a statement in their second game of the season by defeating Oklahoma City, the defending Western Conference champions. While the road to the NBA Finals may run through San Antonio, Dallas is looking to bounce back after a disappointing season. Last year, the defending champs sneaked into the playoffs only to be swept in the first round by the Thunder. The Mavericks are more than capable of competing for a championship but are forced to start the year without Dirk Nowitzki. The 11-time All-Star underwent arthroscopic knee surgery prior to the start of the season and isn’t expected to return for at least six weeks. Nowitzki told ESPN’s Tim MacMahon that it’s up to his teammates to step up in his absence. “The boys need to find a way to win some games, sometimes with defense, win some ugly games,” Nowitzki said, “but definitely find a way to win some games and play some decent basketball until I come back.” The addition of O.J. Mayo has given new life to the Mavericks offense. Mayo signed with Dallas in the offseason and has impressed through the first few games, which includes a 30-point performance in a huge 126-99 win against Charlotte. The Mavericks have looked solid on the young season and should be a complete package once Nowitzki returns. The third Texas team is one that many overlook, but the Houston Rockets are hoping to get noticed with their play this year. After signing...

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Social media outlets a source of news in an age of entertainment

By Jamie Dye With Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Tumblr, students’ free time has been steadily evaporating since the rise of social media, but these sites are also helping relay important events to a generation that does not watch the news or read a paper. Many students spend upwards of three hours daily on social media sites liking their friends’ statuses, reposting pictures of cats and pinning ambitious craft projects. What they may not realize is how many current events are reaching them through social media. Senior psychology and sociology major Christen Barnum admits that she uses the Internet for her entertainment, not for news sites. “I get on to keep up with my friends, get neat craft ideas and watch all the viral videos everyone is talking about,” she said. Although Barnum and other students may not be conscious of it, they are hearing about news events that friends or fan pages are posting or reposting. Senior English and history major Maria Martin admits that she gets news from Facebook that she would not have heard otherwise. “My whole feed was in an uproar about the Disney/Star Wars thing, and before that, my friends were posting articles about Hurricane Sandy. The only reason I remembered to watch the last presidential debate was because someone was tweeting about it,” she said. Social media sites are not only guilty of spreading news, they are invading the mindless diversions of the Internet with awareness. “I don’t have to pay attention to it at all. It’s just absent -minded entertainment,” Barnum said of Facebook. Even as senseless surfing, social media expose people to pressing issues that they may not have otherwise heard about. Currently, the news stations do not have much to say that interests the average college student, especially not when television is full of hyper-violent, less realistic and uninteresting programming. Nevertheless, social media have empowered people, letting them use the portals as means to reach people unwilling, or without the time, to keep up with the world. “I heard about the attacks in Libya on Twitter. It was right next to my friend’s tweet about her breakfast,” Martin said. The popularity and ease of social media have made the Internet everybody’s soapbox. Politically conscious and up-to-date friends are keeping people in the loop, but even those posting their own opinions are still bringing attention to current events. Social movements such as Kony 2012 and breast cancer awareness month depend partly on social media for disseminating information Senior English major Amanda Pate realizes the impact of such media on her understanding and awareness of events. She said “I love the idea of...

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Business students sew hope and seam memories in Peru
Nov16

Business students sew hope and seam memories in Peru

By Brittany Pumphrey It’s not every day that an opportunity arises to change someone’s life, but for the College of Business, the chance presented itself. Two professors and five graduate students recently visited two towns in Peru to oversee a company entitled Threads of Hope. The organization is a group of about 20 women who hand sew patterns into usable items such as oven mitts and Bible cases. Once they are completed, the items are sent to a distribution center in Plano, Texas, to be sold. The graduate students’ responsibility on the trip was to collect research and provide feedback for the business. Associate Professor and Director of the MBA program Dr. Terry Fox was one of the professors who went on the trip. Fox enjoyed his time in Peru and called it an incredible experience. He described the two villages, Lima and Ayacucho, in which the students spent their time. “Belton is a world away from Lima, and Lima is a world away from Ayacucho,” Fox said. Lima is the city where the women worked and sewed the items together. There, the team took time with the women, learning how the business works and taking notes. They also interviewed some of the workers during the process. Fox said, “It was a fact- finding type of trip and … just meeting everyone was amazing. They were so open and welcoming.” He described his trip as being more beneficial to him and the students than it was for the women in Lima. Business management graduate student Michael Kattan also accompanied Fox on the trip. He describes his favorite part about his journey. “The three-hour bike tour was really fun … some accidents happened, but it was fun.” It was Kattan’s first time being introduced to a different environment other than the United States and his home country of Lebanon. He found it interesting to learn about the different cultures and the way they do things in Lima. However, he did find some similarities of his own culture. “It reminds me of being back in my village by the way they dress,” Kattan said. He also believes that they got more out of the experience than the natives just by learning how they ran their business. “It was a great experience I will remember for a long time,” Kattan said. Business administration graduate student Mary Beth Kelton was interested in going on the trip to help with the non-profit side; she was moved in more than one way. “I enjoyed experiencing the differences in culture and working with the women directly. It was humbling to see poverty in real life. They...

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Students dress to impress for Poe
Oct30

Students dress to impress for Poe

By Jasmine Simmons Characters like Princess Leia Organa, Greek mythology’s Medea, and even Mickey and Minnie Mouse could be found in the Moon building Oct. 26 attending the Edgar Allan Poe Festival. The event is an annual party hosted by the university’s chapter of the International English Honor Society, Sigma Tau Delta, and the English Society, an organization that gives students who are not members of the honor society a chance to participate in select activities throughout the year. “This event came from Sigma wanting to get into the spirit of the season while encouraging literacy among the campus community,” Chair of the English department and co-adviser of Sigma Tau Delta Dr. Jacky Dumas said. Named after the dark and eerie 19th century writer, the gathering is a 13-year tradition where Sigma Tau Delta members dress up as interesting characters, eat delectable snacks and participate in fun activities. “The Poe Party is a get-together with my friends in the English department where we honor one of my favorite writers,” junior Kelsey Blecher said. “The party was great this year because everyone put more thought and energy into it.” Many members of Sigma Tau Delta showed up in unique costumes. Senior English/history major Faith Forester came dressed as Zombie Barbie complete with tiara and open wounds. Forester created the Barbie-gone-grotesque image using fake blood, liquid latex and tissues. “I like to watch Michelle Phan make-up tutorial videos, and I actually got the idea from her,” Forester said. “I really like zombie stuff. I took her idea and made it my own.” Not only did members of Sigma dress to impress at the party, there were also a couple of canine companions imitating stars as well. “(My boyfriend and I) brought our two Shih Tzus, Wicket, full name Wicket Chewbacca of Endor, and Eddy, full name Sir Edgar Allan Pup,” Blecher said. “Wicket was dressed up as Chewbacca and Eddy was dressed up as Ewok, both from Return of the Jedi.” There were plenty of festivities at the party, such as the decimation of a pumpkin piñata, the oration of Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven” and the telling of ghost stories. Also, the honors society presented an award for an original writing piece contest to senior English/history major Maria Martin for a poem she wrote. “My favorite part of the party was without a doubt when we took turns telling ghost stories,” junior English major Sarah Norrell said. “Whether you believe in ghosts or not, it is so much fun listening to other people talk about experiences they’ve had and getting creeped out.” As an English organization, Sigma Tau Delta...

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