Super Bowl full of emotion
Feb15

Super Bowl full of emotion

By Leif Johnston The 2013 Super Bowl was full of side stories that just couldn’t be overlooked. Everything from 12-time pro bowler Ray Lewis playing in his last game to the Harbaugh brothers coaching against each other for the first time in Super Bowl history that siblings went face-to-face. The San Francisco ‘49ers also had their fair share of media coverage coming into the playoffs with changing quarterbacks midway through the season, naming Colin Kaepernick their man. All of these interesting stories gave the media just what it craved for the two weeks leading up to the Super Bowl…drama. Both teams were dissected to the point that it felt as though the game would never be played. But, luckily for us, it was. The much-anticipated contest looked for two quarters that all the hype was for nothing. The Ravens came out and took a 21 to 6 lead at half, and added another on the opening kickoff of the second half. Spectators have seen this too many times and tend to anticipate all of the festivities of the game rather than the actual game itself. Sophomore sport management major Victoria Thane said, “I was looking forward to the commercials and halftime show rather than the game. There’s this huge hype over the Super Bowl for about two weeks, and the game never lives up to the hype when game time comes.” The Super Bowl took a drastic turn a few minutes into the  third quarter when over half of the lights in the Superdome cut out, causing a 34-minute delay. This pause in the action stopped Baltimore’s rolling momentum. “The blackout gave the ‘49ers a chance to regroup and think about a bunch of stuff to figure out how to stop Baltimore,” sophomore education major Stanton Holland said. Despite the blackouts’ efforts to bring San Francisco, back into the game, the Ravens stingy defense stood strong to stop a late ‘49ers drive down the field. The game ended with Baltimore on top 34-31. You can be certain that the halftime show of the Super Bowl will always be controversial. With so many people watching, there is no way to please every different type of audience. This year’s entertainment seemed to go over better than Madonna’s performance last year. “Beyonce definitely made up for the last couple years performances. You could tell that everybody liked it by the way Twitter and Facebook exploded after the show,” Holland said. Everyone was waiting with anticipation to see how John Harbaugh, the coach of the Baltimore Ravens, and Jim Harbaugh of the San Francisco ‘49ers would react after the game. One of them...

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Baseball, softball spring season is underway

By Cody Weems Both the Crusader baseball and softball teams begin play this month, and with the start of the season comes the hope and excitement that each new year brings. The biggest story concerning the baseball team is the return of Head Coach Ben Shipp to the dugout. Shipp coached the team from 1986 to 1996 before becoming the university’s athletic director. Shipp said that returning to coaching has been an invigorating experience. “It has been so much fun,” Shipp said. “I think everybody who coaches baseball will tell you baseball players are so much fun to be around, and I had forgotten that.” Freshman outfielder and accounting major Chase Burrow thinks Shipp has brought a new energy to the team. “I think it’s been a positive change,” Burrow said. “He’s made us have a desire and a work ethic to try and change this program around.” The team will have to deal with a lack of experience in the lineup, as only three starting position players return from last year’s team that finished with a record of 21-17.  However, Shipp believes that solid production from his pitching staff will be a strength. “One thing we’ve really been pleased with is the depth of our pitching staff,” Shipp said. “We really feel good about both the quality and the quantity of our staff and the amount of experience that they bring.” Shipp wants to play fundamental baseball this season while building the program for the future. “I’m hoping that at the end of the year, we can look back and say that we’ve energized this group of guys, their love of the game and their love of the university.” The baseball team will face Hendrix College for a three-game series this weekend. The softball team has high expectations for the season after being picked to win the Western Division of the ASC. Head Coach Larry Hennig said that the ultimate goal this season is to win the conference tournament and advance to the regionals. “Probably the most important thing is to win the conference tournament,” Hennig said. “Winning the conference tournament is something we’ve never done here.” Several players return from last year’s team which won the American Southwest Conference West Division with an overall record of 26-17. “We’ve got the foundation for what we hope will be a very good team this year,” Hennig said. “We’ve been picked to win our division, and we’ve got to be able to go out and play at a high level.” Junior pitcher and exercise and sport science major Rebekah Ragsdale hopes the team can build its success. “Last year was...

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International ministry bridges gap
Feb15

International ministry bridges gap

By Alannah Domangue The area remained quiet while small clusters of people entered. After ten minutes, laughter filled the room as students began mingling with strangers. The occasion Thursday evening was only one of the many events hosted by the International Student Ministry. The event name: Game Night with Internationals. The mission: ministry. Students gathered in the SUB for fellowship, fun and food. The night began with a couple of icebreaker games followed by a meet-and-greet activity. Sophomore nursing major Jessica Walker, who serves on the ministry counsel, said the purpose of the festivities was to create “interactions and connections among the students and internationals.” The International Student Ministry attempts to form friendships and relationships “in a non-awkward way and to show (internationals) the love of Christ,” Walker said. In previous years the ministry hosted game nights, but not twice in one year. Since last semester’s event proved so successful, the ministry opted to host an additional activity-filled evening. This semester the turnout exceeded expectations. Senior Christian ministries major Kristin Mercer said the event was her first game night experience with the internationals. Mercer, who attended the Thanksgiving dinner last fall, said the night had “a lot more interaction. It’s fun to see the way our cultures can interact with one another,” Mercer said. Graduate student Wendy Lui, who attended previous game nights, has always appreciated the experience. Lui said interacting during the games gives her a “very good chance to communicate with the American people… and a good chance to practice   English.” Students do not always understand that the game night is for both Americans and internationals. “It’s both ways,” junior exercise sport science major and ministry leadership counsel member Elizabeth Valcin said. The International Student Ministry aims “to attract as many international students as possible, but at the same time  find Americans (to) interact with the international students,” she said. Although last semester’s outcome surprised ministry leaders, planning this event did not cease their worries. The biggest challenge is “getting the word out,” Walker said. “Advertising and making sure people hear about the event” poses a problem for the group, Valcin said, but their turnout usually surpasses anticipations. “We have plenty of ideas, but it’s hard to schedule around the school’s schedule.” Although publicizing is difficult, the events always have great results. The ministry’s main goal is “getting the (international) students to know who we are,” Valcin said. “After game night, I feel like a lot of them knew who I was and were able to come up to me and say hi.” American students will initiate relationships, which allows the internationals to be more interested in...

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CASL encourages student leaders

By Antonio Hebert and Katelyn Holm In 1999, several UMHB students and an alumnus desired an organization that would support the spiritual growth of young leaders. Now called the Christian Association of Student Leaders, the group celebrated its fifteenth anniversary at Howard Payne University Jan. 24-26. The legacy of the UMHB founders continued last week when Crusaders loaded up vans and headed to Brownwood, Texas, for the annual leadership conference. Student Government Association, Residents Hall Association, Baptist Student Ministries, Campus Activities Board and Welcome Week Steering Committee all participated in the retreat. Through the three-day seminar, each campus organization honed in on its specific role from a Christian perspective. In addition, members had the opportunity to interact with representatives from other colleges with the objectives of networking and meaningful relationships. Freshman Savannah Davis enjoyed her first CASL retreat as a part of CAB. “I met a lot of different people from other schools and from UMHB that I had never seen before or talked to,” she said. Along with the relational resources, the conference also provided large general sessions and smaller break-out workshops. This year’s keynote speaker was Mike Jorgensen, executive director of the evangelistic and discipleship ministry, I Am Second. Throughout his lectures, Jorgensen taught those in attendance about effective leadership, stressing the importance of servitude and humility. He explained that, often, people in powerful positions fear passing responsibility to someone else. “The measure of a leader is not what you can individually do,” he said. By building up other people, the group functions less on one individual and has more of an impact. To inspire a collegiate atmosphere, each night of the conference featured a special entertainment event. Thursday, a Christian illusionist brought some tricks from Tennessee to wow his Texas audience. B.J. Harris III’s presentation included his testimony, card tricks and an impressive escape from a strait jacket. Although Harris put on a good show, his practical message stood out the most. Davis said, “My favorite part was probably the illusionist. It was really cool how he tied in all his tricks with a lesson about how we shouldn’t be deceived.” Sophomore marketing and international business double major Hallie Holden represented UMHB this year and helped facilitate the school’s involvement. “I am most excited for all the other schools to see UMHB and see why we love our school,” she said. “I hope they get to see a little bit of what  makes it so great while they are on our...

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Sigma Pi ignites scientific interest in the community

By Alannah Domangue Beginning this story with a chemistry joke would prove itself easy, but Sigma Pi members would probably say, all of them argon. It could be the mutual love for chemistry that brings these science enthusiasts together, or possibly the pure enjoyment of watching objects explode. For a number of years, the chemistry club, formally known as Sigma Pi, has been recognized on a national level under the reins of former university professor, Dr. Darrell Watson. This spring, the American Chemical Society will present the club with the Commendable Chapter Award and the Green Chemistry Student Chapter Award for the previous academic year. Since Sigma Pi’s charter in 1977, students and faculty consider the club as one of the most active organizations on campus. It focuses on outreach. Senior chemistry and computer science double major and club environmental officer Zach Winfield said, “Our main goal is to teach kids science isn’t as scary as it seems.” The team does this through various activities both on and off campus. A shared favorite among most of the club members is Demos In The Dark, an annual event held in October. Quy Nguyen, senior biology and chemistry double major and club president, said he enjoys creating the explosions for the demo performance. Later in the fall, the group hosts a day of experiments for local children called Science Saturday, a favorite of senior chemistry major and club historian Alayne Cockrell. “All the little kids are so funny when they get to play with the experiments. It’s very special to be a part of that.” However, club members don’t always spend their time creating attended mayhem. Members work diligently to keep Bell County and the campus clean. “Those recycling bins around,” said Cockrell.  “Those are ours.” The organization takes responsibility for maintaining campus recycle bins. The club also volunteers on behalf of Adopt-A-Highway for regular roadside cleanup. Additionally, every April, Sigma Pi never fails to set up its Earth Day booth in the SUB to advocate for green living conditions. Chemistry club co-sponsor, Dr. Joy Ahlgren-Beckendorf, is new to the organization this year. She enjoys working with students in ways outside of the classroom. “I learn about my students on another dimension,” Ahglren-Beckendorf said. “The best part is, I don’t have to give them a grade.” Members said the chemistry club continues to grow, creating further opportunities for locals and students. Recently, the group worked with local Girl and Boy Scout groups for the children to earn science badges. Currently, the group pushes to create tutoring sessions for lower-level chemistry classes at the university. Although the club presents high achievements for...

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