Mother joins children to continue family education
Jan29

Mother joins children to continue family education

THE BELLS — It’s one thing to sit back, watch your kids walk across the stage, look directly at you and mouth “I did it, mom.” It’s quite another to personally hand them their ticket to adulthood. Denise Berg, UMHB’s admissions and recruiting coordinator, was able to be on stage and share the commencement moment with her daughter, recent alumna Sami Berg.   Throughout high school, going off to college is the dream of escaping from parents into a realm of independence. Going off to college with your mom, who also attends classes, isn’t quite as ideal for most. “I had always thought I’d go to school somewhere farther away, but honestly I’m glad I didn’t,” confessed Sami Berg. “I saw all my friends driving three to four hours just to see their family, wasting time on the road. I never had to. I was half an hour away from mine. Home really is where the heart is.” The mother-daughter duo have shared classes together, as has the son. “We had criminal investigations,” sophomore accounting major Andrew Berg said. “She sat right in front of me, but the class was normal. Sure, having my mom in my class might be weird, but it helped me stay focused.” As a college student, letting things slip away from you at school can hard to manage at times. Having someone, especially your mom, to help make sure to keep your head in the game and remind you what will be due, could be nice and save a little money on planners, if you’re into those kinds of things. “Going to school with my mom wasn’t too bad,” he said. “Actually it kind of helped to keep my head on straight and do my work.” Andrew wasn’t the only Berg who had a class with his mom. Sami Berg shared a class with their mom as well. “My mother and I shared a whopping three classes together last semester,” she said. “I know — holy Batman —  but it was great. My mom has always kept me together when I’m falling apart.” The siblings and parent shared a classroom on Tuesday nights last semester. Lined up like ducks in a row, they stayed focused together. Denise Berg is the admissions and recruiting coordinator for the university. She works the standard eight to five workday and her lunch break consisted of a New Testament class, a pack of gum and a water bottle. Denise expressed the life lesson that she has made for her children, using herself as the example to show them that there are better opportunities. Wanting only what is best for them,...

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A Letter from Student Body President Collin Davies
Jan29

A Letter from Student Body President Collin Davies

 Spring. New Year. Second semester. Welcome back to Mary Hardin-Baylor, or if this is your first semester, a special welcome to you as you begin your journey here. I am currently privileged to lead you and your fellow classmates as the student body president. This honor prompts me to think about students and this university now more than any other period of my education. For this I am grateful. There are many reasons to be excited about being a student here, and I would like to urge you to continue to make Mary Hardin-Baylor an exciting and transformative experience for future students. How should we make the most of our college experience? We quote scripture in times of excitement or deep sadness and claim the words as life, but how true the words of scripture are in all seasons. Primarily, prioritize a relationship with the creator and author of all things. May your identity be in Jesus Christ and your confidence in him. This will prepare you for success in college and beyond. You should also identify and pursue that which interests you most. There are many venues on campus that will develop you as an individual into a better-equipped learner and doer. Do not forget about the community. For many of us, the setting of UMHB was a point of examination prior to school selection. Be sure to explore all opportunities whether on or off campus, and begin to pursue your goals. Finally, invest in relationships. There will be very few settings quite like college for the remainder of your life. Use free time and the availability of others wisely. Continue to build old relationships and also begin new friendships. Learn to pour into relationships, but also learn from relationships. Unsurprisingly, as student body president, I am constantly being challenged and sharpened by individuals with more experience and knowledge than myself. For the university in particular, there are many reasons for my contentment. I am grateful for the present diversity. I am thankful for the relationships that shape and support character. I am excited for the new and eager for the future. I am indebted to the examples of leadership modeled on this campus by administrators, professors and staff members. Thank you for believing that I could lead the student body well and supporting me as an individual and the Student Government Association. Know that you are thought of highly, prayed for often and of interest to this university. ———————————————————————————- Davies offers encouragement to students with this verse: “And this is my prayer: that your love may abound more and more in knowledge and depth of insight, so...

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Making the move: should UMHB consider DII?
Nov20

Making the move: should UMHB consider DII?

Staff editorial With an impressive new stadium uniting students and bringing national attention, rumors about moving up from Division III to Division II are natural. Though no real statement has been made, students have already developed opinions on the hot topic. Should UMHB call in the moving vans, or hold off? A lot of Crusaders shy away from the chance of change. They believe that though moving up to DII is something up for debate, it’s not a reality that should come to fruition anytime soon. Academically, the university has a solid foundation for higher education with a Christian emphasis. Athletically, teams are succeeding on every field and court. In this case, patience is key. A move up too soon will result in the school missing out on the successes it can enjoy now. Although it would be great, the initial change to Division II would bring down the quality of athletics. The Cru wouldn’t dominate against the bigger, more experienced teams. 80-0 wins like those of the football team this year would no longer exist. While better competition would be more fun for fans and athletes alike, a few years of losing seasons would follow a shift into a larger division. Students attending the university during this transition would miss out on UMHB’s dominating tradition. The quality of the average student would probably go down too. Now, the school recruits outstanding individuals with merit, service and academics. Division II schools receive more attention than DIII, and this could bring in more prospective students that aren’t necessarily looking for a faith-based education but just a prestigious college. Though there are many disadvantages, there are also many promising advantages to advancing into DII. One of the biggest, the ability to hand out academic scholarships, would strengthen the excellence of athletics. Having experienced sports teams would balance the increased competition from bigger schools. Furthermore, teams would pay to play the Cru. This would bring in more funds for the sports programs. UMHB could rent out the stadium to other teams as well, providing additional opportunities to bring in some revenue. With the increase in money, scholarships of many kinds could be awarded. More scholarships mean more people on campus. Some students are afraid the Christian environment would be compromised by moving up. Some have even gone so far as to stereotype athletes as partiers, but there may be no founding for this stereotype. People with this viewpoint challenge Crusaders to adopt a viewpoint of love. While students question the integrity of future changes, it could be an opportunity to reach more people for Christ. Fear of a new demographic shouldn’t influence...

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Lady Cru soccer finishes season after loss to UT-Dallas
Nov20

Lady Cru soccer finishes season after loss to UT-Dallas

The ball crosses the line as the crowd erupts in screams of joy as the women’s soccer team makes it to the semifinals of the American Southwest Conference playoff tournament. Head Women’s soccer coach and UMHB Alumnus Barry Elkins said. The shot “was the most amazing finish I’ve ever seen. In all my years of playing soccer, I’ve never seen a winning goal like that.” Elkins, a former soccer player for the university from 1992-95, became head coach last year. He has already helped coach the team into its first winning record in four years and received ASC Coach of the Year. The tournament Nov. 7-9 put the team to the test. Elkins said, “This was our first trip, and I had no experience in the ASC tournament. We played pretty good, finishing 2-1 against Concordia scoring the last second, [then] played University of Texas at Dallas in the semifinals. Although the Cru fell short, there was still plenty to be proud of. “They had a goal in the end to win the game. We didn’t make any real mistakes that stood out,” Elkins said. The team featured seven freshmen starters. One is freshman nursing major Kathryn Parker. She received ASC Offensive Freshman of the Year after leading the ASC in shots (74). “No one knew what to expect. I felt really good though. I had my goals, but I didn’t know if I could accomplish them,” Parker said. The Cru faced adversity all year but fought through it all.Parker said the training “was working for us. The closer we got to the tournament you have more injuries that you have to worry about because you’re worn out from the season.” A big loss came when the team had to play without one of their leaders. “Our center back Charis Brantley got hurt and it really affected our second game because of how much she contributes to the team.,” Parker said. The Cru have a lot to look foward to next season. Elkins said, “as well as we did, we can improve. This gave us a cornerstone for what’s to...

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Local ROTC students train at Fort Hood
Nov20

Local ROTC students train at Fort Hood

The students were tired, weary, and covered in sweat. The sun beat down as ROTC cadets from UMHB, Central Texas College and Tarleton State University came together Oct. 29-30 for field training exercises. The Reserve Officer Training Corps is a program instituted by the U.S. Army to train and develop college students seeking to become Army officers. Senior military science instructor, Maj. Chris Jay, said this training “gives us a chance to spend a couple of days without distractions to focus on our situational training.” Cadets spent one night and two days out on the training course where they sharpened their skills and developed new tactics under the observation of military science instructors. Junior pre-physical therapy major and third-year military science ROTC cadet, Holly Millican, said, “We received one hot meal, and two meals ready-to-eat, also called MREs. We took them with us and ate what we could throughout the training. We slept out in the woods. Some cadets built hooches while others built tents. Most cadets, though, just slept underneath the stars.” The training was at Fort Hood area 72. During the attack missions, facilitators and evaluators from different schools graded and scored each cadet’s individual performance as a squad leader, team leader, and radio transmitter operator. Millican said the field training exercise, or FTX, has “six different types of attacks ambush, recon, squad attack, improvised explosive device, movement to contact, and fortified cache. Each mission is assigned to a military science junior cadet. The training is scheduled each semester for ROTCs across the nation to improve tactical skills for land navigation and situational exercise training lanes.” A squad leader is responsible for six to eight soldiers  and makes all the decisions of how to react to the situation presented. Senior interdisciplinary studies major, Alicia Reid, is currently in the U.S. Army in her ninth year of service. Reid has been deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq and knows  what it takes to become an Army officer. “My job at the FTX was to facilitate a lane. Cadets arrived to my lane, and I would read them an operation order. When you’re going through the lanes over and over, it becomes more natural,” Reid said.  “Your leadership skills show even when your situation is out of control. UMHB cadets exemplify Army values but carry the morals and values our school promotes.” Each mission has three phases. The planning of a mission is when the squad leader receives the mission from headquarters and delivers the information needed to his subordinates. The movement phase consists of progress toward the objective. Lastly the actions on is when the mission is carried out....

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