Making the move: should UMHB consider DII?
Nov20

Making the move: should UMHB consider DII?

Staff editorial With an impressive new stadium uniting students and bringing national attention, rumors about moving up from Division III to Division II are natural. Though no real statement has been made, students have already developed opinions on the hot topic. Should UMHB call in the moving vans, or hold off? A lot of Crusaders shy away from the chance of change. They believe that though moving up to DII is something up for debate, it’s not a reality that should come to fruition anytime soon. Academically, the university has a solid foundation for higher education with a Christian emphasis. Athletically, teams are succeeding on every field and court. In this case, patience is key. A move up too soon will result in the school missing out on the successes it can enjoy now. Although it would be great, the initial change to Division II would bring down the quality of athletics. The Cru wouldn’t dominate against the bigger, more experienced teams. 80-0 wins like those of the football team this year would no longer exist. While better competition would be more fun for fans and athletes alike, a few years of losing seasons would follow a shift into a larger division. Students attending the university during this transition would miss out on UMHB’s dominating tradition. The quality of the average student would probably go down too. Now, the school recruits outstanding individuals with merit, service and academics. Division II schools receive more attention than DIII, and this could bring in more prospective students that aren’t necessarily looking for a faith-based education but just a prestigious college. Though there are many disadvantages, there are also many promising advantages to advancing into DII. One of the biggest, the ability to hand out academic scholarships, would strengthen the excellence of athletics. Having experienced sports teams would balance the increased competition from bigger schools. Furthermore, teams would pay to play the Cru. This would bring in more funds for the sports programs. UMHB could rent out the stadium to other teams as well, providing additional opportunities to bring in some revenue. With the increase in money, scholarships of many kinds could be awarded. More scholarships mean more people on campus. Some students are afraid the Christian environment would be compromised by moving up. Some have even gone so far as to stereotype athletes as partiers, but there may be no founding for this stereotype. People with this viewpoint challenge Crusaders to adopt a viewpoint of love. While students question the integrity of future changes, it could be an opportunity to reach more people for Christ. Fear of a new demographic shouldn’t influence...

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Lady Cru soccer finishes season after loss to UT-Dallas
Nov20

Lady Cru soccer finishes season after loss to UT-Dallas

The ball crosses the line as the crowd erupts in screams of joy as the women’s soccer team makes it to the semifinals of the American Southwest Conference playoff tournament. Head Women’s soccer coach and UMHB Alumnus Barry Elkins said. The shot “was the most amazing finish I’ve ever seen. In all my years of playing soccer, I’ve never seen a winning goal like that.” Elkins, a former soccer player for the university from 1992-95, became head coach last year. He has already helped coach the team into its first winning record in four years and received ASC Coach of the Year. The tournament Nov. 7-9 put the team to the test. Elkins said, “This was our first trip, and I had no experience in the ASC tournament. We played pretty good, finishing 2-1 against Concordia scoring the last second, [then] played University of Texas at Dallas in the semifinals. Although the Cru fell short, there was still plenty to be proud of. “They had a goal in the end to win the game. We didn’t make any real mistakes that stood out,” Elkins said. The team featured seven freshmen starters. One is freshman nursing major Kathryn Parker. She received ASC Offensive Freshman of the Year after leading the ASC in shots (74). “No one knew what to expect. I felt really good though. I had my goals, but I didn’t know if I could accomplish them,” Parker said. The Cru faced adversity all year but fought through it all.Parker said the training “was working for us. The closer we got to the tournament you have more injuries that you have to worry about because you’re worn out from the season.” A big loss came when the team had to play without one of their leaders. “Our center back Charis Brantley got hurt and it really affected our second game because of how much she contributes to the team.,” Parker said. The Cru have a lot to look foward to next season. Elkins said, “as well as we did, we can improve. This gave us a cornerstone for what’s to...

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Local ROTC students train at Fort Hood
Nov20

Local ROTC students train at Fort Hood

The students were tired, weary, and covered in sweat. The sun beat down as ROTC cadets from UMHB, Central Texas College and Tarleton State University came together Oct. 29-30 for field training exercises. The Reserve Officer Training Corps is a program instituted by the U.S. Army to train and develop college students seeking to become Army officers. Senior military science instructor, Maj. Chris Jay, said this training “gives us a chance to spend a couple of days without distractions to focus on our situational training.” Cadets spent one night and two days out on the training course where they sharpened their skills and developed new tactics under the observation of military science instructors. Junior pre-physical therapy major and third-year military science ROTC cadet, Holly Millican, said, “We received one hot meal, and two meals ready-to-eat, also called MREs. We took them with us and ate what we could throughout the training. We slept out in the woods. Some cadets built hooches while others built tents. Most cadets, though, just slept underneath the stars.” The training was at Fort Hood area 72. During the attack missions, facilitators and evaluators from different schools graded and scored each cadet’s individual performance as a squad leader, team leader, and radio transmitter operator. Millican said the field training exercise, or FTX, has “six different types of attacks ambush, recon, squad attack, improvised explosive device, movement to contact, and fortified cache. Each mission is assigned to a military science junior cadet. The training is scheduled each semester for ROTCs across the nation to improve tactical skills for land navigation and situational exercise training lanes.” A squad leader is responsible for six to eight soldiers  and makes all the decisions of how to react to the situation presented. Senior interdisciplinary studies major, Alicia Reid, is currently in the U.S. Army in her ninth year of service. Reid has been deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq and knows  what it takes to become an Army officer. “My job at the FTX was to facilitate a lane. Cadets arrived to my lane, and I would read them an operation order. When you’re going through the lanes over and over, it becomes more natural,” Reid said.  “Your leadership skills show even when your situation is out of control. UMHB cadets exemplify Army values but carry the morals and values our school promotes.” Each mission has three phases. The planning of a mission is when the squad leader receives the mission from headquarters and delivers the information needed to his subordinates. The movement phase consists of progress toward the objective. Lastly the actions on is when the mission is carried out....

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Opinion Showdown: Halloween – A holiday for candy and fun or a ghoulish tradition to shun?
Oct22

Opinion Showdown: Halloween – A holiday for candy and fun or a ghoulish tradition to shun?

  Cody Weems – Pro-Halloween Halloween is a time of ghosts, goblins and what many believe to be harmless fun. It has become a part of American culture and a tradition that many look forward to. However, the celebration of demonic creatures has rightfully brought some controversy to the holiday regarding its relationship to the Christian church. One debate is whether or not Christian-affiliated universities should observe the occasion. Halloween originated as a Celtic tradition. The original purpose of it was to serve as a day of remembrance for the dead. While some may argue that Christians should not engage in such behavior, it’s important to see the entire context of the celebration. Yes, it’s true that Christians normally wouldn’t want to associate themselves with a holiday that condones demons and devils, but the way in which most Christians observe Halloween is seen as harmless fun. Most view the day as an opportunity to experience a good scare while indulging in unhealthy amounts of candy. The problem would come if Christians were to start participating in the holiday in a religious nature. If Halloween were to interfere with Christian ideologies, that’s when it would become a problem. The way to prevent this is for parents to reiterate the purpose of Halloween to their children from a young age. Those who wish to allow their children to participate in the festivities should teach them the purpose of the day is just for fun and that there should be a separation of Halloween and Christian faith. If this is done, then the observance on a Christian campus shouldn’t be an issue. The one argument against the holiday is the possible religious connotations. But if students view the day as a recreational activity instead of a religious ritual, then it should be held to the same standard as any football game or other events intended to provide entertainment on campus. Even though Halloween originated with religious connotations that don’t match up with Christian views, students should realize that the holiday as currently observed in the United States does not have the same intentions that it once did. It has evolved into a social tradition rather than a religious one. So, to say that Halloween conflicts with Christian views is inaccurate since most don’t associate any religious connotations to the holiday. In order for the holiday to be celebrated without controversy, students and Christian universities need to avoid falling into any religious controversies associated with the day and take Halloween for what it has become—a chance to eat candy, have a scare and enjoy a fun, safe time. Seth Stephens – Anti-Halloween Trick...

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New Goodwill Impacts Community
Oct22

New Goodwill Impacts Community

The first Heart of Texas Goodwill Industries retail store in Belton opened on Sparta Road behind Wal-Mart in September, and many students are checking out what it has to offer. Retail store Manager Tiffany Spears said with Halloween around the corner, the workers are seeing a lot of college students come in to search for costumes. “I enjoy seeing them trying out different looks and having fun with it, but the best part is knowing that they’re buying something at an affordable price, especially since a lot of their money is going towards their education,” Spears said. The donated items sold at Goodwill go through a thorough inspection to ensure only quality goods make it to the racks and shelves said Director of Retail Rebecca Potter. “The sorters, pricers, taggers and cashiers are all trained to look for stains, tears and scratches on products, so each merchandise is reviewed several times before a customer purchases it,” Potter said as she explained the inspection and selection process. She added that employees set out most of the newly received donations within 24 hours, and an average of more than 800 new clothing items are hung on the racks every day, a fact that impressed sophomore multimedia and information technology major Hannah Warren. “I’ve never really considered shopping at a Goodwill in the past, but once I noticed that a lot of my friends shopped there, I decided to go to the store myself. You’d be surprised at all the great things you can find there, and you can always find something new each time you go,” Warren said. She thinks the thrift shop trend is increasing, especially among people in college, because most of them try to find even the smallest way to save money. Regional Manager CC Davis said business has been steady so far for the new store in the early going. “These past couple of weeks have been very busy for us, and we are very optimistic that customers will keep coming back, new ones will keep coming in, and that we will continue to be as busy as we have been lately.” In addition to the retail store is a Goodwill Industries Learning Center, which teaches important life skills and is funded by the profits made by the retail store. “The mission of the center is to actively pursue the full participation in society of people with disabilities and disadvantages by expanding their opportunities and capabilities through our employment and training programs,” Learning Center Coordinator Sabrina Negron said. The Center gives people tools to become more employable, which can range from teaching them how to write resumes...

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