8.3 percent gives hope

In October 2009, the U.S. hit double digits in unemployment with 10.2 percent which has been the highest in almost 30 years. Since then, unemployment has been a hot button issue and at the forefront of political campaigns. Unfortunately for George W. Bush and Barack Obama, they came in after an economic high and every up has its down. By the same token, every down has its up, and some president gets to throw his nose in the air and say, “I fixed this recession.” Every candidate in the running for the Republican nomination claims to have the answer to speed up the economic recovery, which they will inevitably point back out if they win the election. Now two months deep in to 2012, we have heard the good news that unemployment has dropped to 8.3 percent almost 2 percent lower than the high we reached in 2009. What does it all mean? Recovery. This nation has been treading water for years in its worst economic climate of the 21st century. January provided almost a quarter of a million jobs to Americans and those weathering the storm are starting to poke their heads back out and loosen their clutch on their money. Politically, Obama will be able to boast that under his administration, unemployment has dropped to the lowest in the past three years. While candidates of the GOP may argue that his policies are not providing the fastest recovery, it’s still a recovery, and Americans are hurting for any kind of job. There are still almost 13 million Americans without a job, still a daunting fact that faces any politician. But while the white-collared sort that out, the “99 percent,” need to start looking up. Headlines brandishing the lower unemployment rate should only encourage American’s and boost a morale that has not been in high spirits for some time. The old saying, “Time heals all things” needs to start surrounding the American public because if the “pity me” mindset continues to fuel earnest Americans, we will have to make permanent residencies on major streets across the U.S. Jobs are available, but they are not on Wall Street. Oh you camped four weeks on Congress Avenue? You could have spent four weeks applying for jobs. This group should focus on a new percentage, 8.3 percent and help make it smaller. Last semester The Bells ran a story titled, “Americans in need of humility.” It expressed the vast expanse of unemployment in the U.S. the answer to which was people should roll up their sleeves and get down and dirty for an honest paycheck. I doubt the thousands of recently...

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Super Bowl XLVI: Giants upset Patriots for a second time

The New York Giants are World Champions. Super Bowl XLVI was an injury-stricken, smash-mouth, football game that came down to the wire. The Giants took an early lead and scored nine unanswered points, including an uncharacteristic mistake by New England quarterback Tom Brady that resulted in a safety and a touchdown. However, the Patriots have one of the most efficient offenses in the league, and they rallied together to put some points on the board. A Stephen Gostkowski field goal opened them up, and was it followed by the last minute touchdown, a short four-yard pass to running back, Danny Woodhead. After the star-studded half time show, fans came back to the Patriots receiving the ball, but it wasn’t until the third quarter that Brady found Aaron Hernandez to waltz it in to the end zone to put them up by eight. The Pats had an opportunity to seal the deal, but a rare Brady interception would eliminate that chance and shift momentum. Two Laurence Tynes field goals would bring the Giants two points shy and would take possession with about six minutes left to march down field, 88 yards to score. Time management became an issue for the Patriots with the Giants knocking at their door. They seemingly let Bradshaw score with just under a minute left to leave themselves some time to make a comeback. After a failed two-point conversion, the Patriots would receive a touchback that would start them at the 20-yard line. The Pats started the drive on a bad note. Two dropped passes in the hands of the receivers that could have changed the game. More bad news struck as Brady was sacked. Belichick was forced to burn his final timeout to set up a fourth and 16 with 36 ticks left on the clock. Brady completed a 19-yard pass to keep the drive alive. At the end of the drive, the best the Patriots could do was set up a third and five on the Giants 49 yard line with five second left. Brady took the snap out of the gun, dropped back and was as patient as possible before he released a 50-yard bomb intended for Aaron Hernandez. It was batted away, and just like that the Giants would defeat the Patriots a second time. A Giants victory opens up a lot of topics, for example during the season there was talk of replacing Tom Coughlin as NYG head coach. While the Giants scraped in to the post-season with a record of 9-7, the man still won a Super Bowl. He isn’t going anywhere. Eli Manning sets himself apart as an elite...

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CEO’s giant salary justified

For months now, several important streets across America have been filled with the “99 percent,” protesting issues such as CEO salaries of, oh say, $378 million. CEO of Apple Inc. and successor to Steve Jobs, Tim Cook, has been awarded such an income. When compared to his predecessor’s annual salary of one single U.S. dollar, yes, it may seem something to scoff at. But before we pick up our torches and pitchforks for yet another multi-million dollar paycheck, let some things be considered. Start with the fact that Jobs had a very modest annual salary, but the man was not exactly struggling to make ends meet. According to Forbes, Jobs owned 5.426 million shares of Apple valued at $2.17 billion, on top of his cut of the 138 million shares of Disney that he gained when he sold Pixar, worth $4.3 billion. In conclusion, Jobs had a net worth of $7 billion as of September 2011. Tim Cook did not. Apple has offered Cook $378 million, which now seems smaller after looking under Jobs’ mattress, but take a close look at this contract.  One important fact that seems to get lost is that most of this money comes in restricted stock units, one million of them to be exact. The Securities and Exchange Commission’s filing for Cook’s contract clearly states that half of the million shares would be granted to him on August 24, 2016, and the other half exactly five years later in 2021. These shares make up about $377 of the $378 million dollar contract and are not part of a per annum; Cook’s annual salary is actually $900,000 per year. Thirteen-year-old Jaden Smith made more for the Karate Kid films he starred in. Apple has revolutionized technology in recent years. The innovative employees deserve to be paid accordingly. Additionally, Cook’s salary does not even cross the threshold into Forbes’ 100 highest paid CEO’s. So rest assured, Cook will not be raking in nearly $400 million per year, and, no, Forbes won’t have to tally yet another billionaire. wCook has a lot of work to do in order to continue the legacy left by  billionaire Steve Jobs, and he is not nearly the highest paid CEO. Rants towards his financial compensation should be redirected toward other business elites,  with salaries in the hundreds of millions, not for those who make six figure incomes.  Not to say that he isn’t making a lot of money, but there are much bigger fish to...

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Wicks: Multi-sport athlete
Jan24

Wicks: Multi-sport athlete

The beautiful game, America’s past time. These two sports do not coincide much; here at UMHB, however, they have one thing in common, Tyler Wicks. College sports are a growing phenomenon. Countless adolescent athletes only dream of playing college ball. A select few do, but only an elite breed of versatile athletes is blessed with the opportunity to play two sports. “It takes a special person  to play two sports at the college level,” said baseball head coach Derek Dunaway, “but … he’s one of those special guys that can do it.” The sophomore sport management major from Wills Point, Texas, has an insatiable thirst for sports. Wicks lettered in football, baseball, basketball, tennis and track at Wills Point High School and played club soccer throughout. Given his resume, one sport obviously was not going to satiate his craving for team sports, and he could only realize those dreams at a school like UMHB. “I love soccer and baseball. I feel like if I went anywhere else I wouldn’t be able to do both,” Wicks said. Initially he joined the Cru to play soccer, his first love. However, his career as a college athlete would immediately take a turn for the worse within the first week  of his freshman year. A minute and a half into a scrimmage, Wicks agitated a previous injury. He underwent light rehab and was given the OK to return, but it did not take long for him to realize that something was wrong. An MRI revealed a minor tear of the medial cruciate ligament and complete tears of both his meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. His season was over before it even got a chance to begin; surgery would bench him for four months. Needless to say, the season was over when he got back on his feet, but he had to stay active. Wicks began working out with his roommate Garrett Kinney, a freshman also from Wills Point competing for the catcher position on the baseball team. Kinney soon persuaded Wicks to go out for the baseball team. They needed a pinch runner, and he needed to compete. He was added to the roster mid-season and finished out the season playing outfield for the Cru, competing for the baseball team before he even wore a soccer jersey for the Cru. School let out, summer passed and fall arrived. Wicks picked up soccer as though he had never stopped. He was moved to defensive center midfielder and even scored two goals to earn his title as a starter. Wicks did not participate in the fall season for baseball, but is...

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Hopes of successful second half of season
Jan10

Hopes of successful second half of season

Crusader tennis starts the year hard at work practicing for what they hope will be another winning season this spring. Neither the men nor women will play their first match until late February, but they have begun preparing to hit the ground running. Both teams are coming off of winning seasons and are looking to improve this spring. The head coach for men and women is James Cohagan. His take on the spring 2012 season is, “We’re excited for (the season) to start. … It’s hard for the players and myself to live through the split season,” he said. Cohagan was referring to the brief season they have in the fall, which consists only of two tournaments. The long break between September and February leaves the teams ready for the spring season to start. Freshman international economics major John Martin has begun that split season and can attest that it is a big jump from high school tennis. However, the extra time between fall and spring has allowed Martin to bond with his team. He also asserts that the team captain has been a big help in the transition to college tennis. “Josh Pownall talks to all the freshmen and makes sure he knows everyone by name. …” Martin said. “He’s really a good leader in terms of making sure we do what we’re supposed to do and especially making it fun.” The men finished 4-2 in the ASC and 8-7 overall. Leading the men are seniors sport management major Pownall and mass communication/journalism major Garrett Pekar. On the other hand, the Lady Cru, led by senior twins Megan and Mallory Aarhus, finished 6-0 in conference play, losing only 7 of the 54 matches played in the ASC and 13-6 overall. The ladies took home the ASC West title, and the Aarhus sisters, the NCAA Division III championship veterans, took doubles. Both the Cru and Lady Cru have been strong in doubles. Cohagan has expressed that this dominance will ease the singles lineups. Cohagan certainly has quite a duo in his arsenal of doubles teams in the Aarhus sibilings. Exercise and sport science major Mallory said it is a definite advantage to play double matches with her sister. “We know everything about each other, how to get along, each other’s limits, strength and weaknesses,” she said. Leading the men’s doubles from last year is team captain Pownall and Daniel White, who finished 8-6 overall. However, both seniors will graduate at the end of the spring semester. Among others emerging as leaders are sophomore mass communication/journalism major Jacob Stamps and  junior spanish and chemistry major Collin Davies, who will be...

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