Dallas: “Big things happen here”

Dallas, home to many UMHB students, boasts many attractions for the casual tourist or the history buff. From museums to restaurants, gardens to galas and shops to theaters, this bustling city has a lot to offer. For the lover of the arts, there is the Dallas Museum of Art. The exhibit hosts 18th-20th century European and American art, ancient Mediterranean art and art from the Americas, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. In addition, visitors can observe scientists preserving and restoring the museum’s collection with the latest technology in the Paintings Conservation Studio. The new AT&T Discovery District outside of the museum is the perfect destination for food and entertainment. It provides watch parties for sports and local musicians, gallery exhibits and showcases, and diverse meals from destination-worthy food. Downtown, the Dallas Arboretum displays 66 acres of beautiful gardens all year round. It is the home of Dallas Blooms Spring, the largest outdoor floral festival in the Southwest. Tourists can stroll through dainty cottages, meadows of flowers and Japanese-style gardens. If you are feeling a little daring, the Zero Gravity Amusement Park is the only amusement park that features five different thrill rides, this includes the “Nothin’ But Net,” the “Bungee Jump,” the “Skycoaster,” “Texas Blastoff” and the “Skyscraper.” The Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament exists for those fascinated with the culture of the Middle Ages. Costumed knights demonstrate jousting and sword-fighting in an arena similar to what one might expect from that time period. Guests root for the knight of their choice as they enjoy medieval meals served by clever jesters. Finally, Reunion Tower offers a spectacular view of Downtown Dallas. Atop the rotating restaurant, guests get a 360-degree experience of the city. With these tourist spots and many more, it is no wonder that Dallas is the place to be in North...

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The architecture of agility explained: scoring, tumbling, and acrobatics
Dec05

The architecture of agility explained: scoring, tumbling, and acrobatics

UMHB now has an Acrobatics and Tumbling team. But what does that mean? How does that differ from gymnastics in the Olympics? In women’s gymnastics competitions there are three apparatuses used: vault, uneven bars and balance beam. Men’s gymnastics involve parallel bars instead of unevens, and rings instead of the balance beam.) In contrast, acrobatics and tumbling does not involve equipment. Acrobatics and tumbling consist of tosses, tumbling, pyramids and acrobatic lifts. Teams typically compete in six events: compulsories, acro, pyramid, toss, tumbling and a team event. The meets consist of two to four teams competing in head to head and team events. The National Collegiate Acrobatics and Tumbling Association defines acrobatics and tumbling as, “the evolution of different forms of gymnastics.”  Gymnastics is defined as a physical exercise of coordination and strength. A typical meet would go like this: The first event is compulsory. Each team competes with identical previously determined skills with a 10.0 starting value. This skill can be a back salto to ground or possibly a front salto (a flip that does not involve hands) dismount. These examples were used because they are the types of skills that most people think of when referencing gymnastics or similar sports. The second event is acrobatics (often shortened as acro), which is where two to four athletes compete against another team in acrobatic movements. Teams compete to win a total of 30 points in this event. “Acrobatics looks like athletic stuff that is really hard to do, and with just one wrong move something very bad could happen,” freshman pre-med biology major Chloe Wilson noted. Event three is the pyramid; teams compete to win a maximum of 30 points. For this event, teams want to use as few athletes as possible. This can help create more difficult pyramids, thus earning more points. The athletes manipulate their bodies to create the pyramids. Next, there is a halftime of approximately 15 minutes where teams warm-up for the second half of the competition. The team may practice on the practice mats, stretch their muscles or amplify their level of excitement for the next events. The next even is the toss. This event consists of four athletes tossing a fifth athlete in the air, while the fifth athlete completes flips and/or twists forward or backward. Two of the tosses will be solo while the third while is synchronized with another athlete who is being tossed in the air by four athletes of the same team. This event has a possible overall score of 30 points. The fifth event is tumbling. This event has a maximum of 60 points. Athletes have the option...

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Summer filled with training for UMHB ROTC cadets
Dec05

Summer filled with training for UMHB ROTC cadets

Many college students spend their summers making money at a part-time job, going on vacation or simply catching up on much-needed sleep. However, nine of the students in UMHB’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program did something a little different this summer. All nine cadets traveled to Fort Knox, Kentucky to complete Advanced Camp, a month-long summer training program for upcoming seniors. This program is considered to be the most important training event for a cadet, and successful completion of the program is a prerequisite for commissioning as a second lieutenant in the Army. During the Advanced Camp, cadets participate in classroom, field and weapons training, and they learn how to be successful officers. There they are assessed in their leadership skills, and they are tested in their physical skills. “The participants pass a physical fitness test, plus they take part in three road marches of 6, 8 and 12-miles with a 35-lb rucksack (an army version of an oversized backpack),” Senior military science instructor Carl Cook said. “They must complete a land navigation assessment and basic rifle marksmanship as part of nine mandatory requirements.” Advanced Camp serves as the final assessment for senior cadets before they are assigned to a branch of the Army. This year, six UMHB students will commission—one in December and five in May.  Spring UMHB graduate Matthew Boquiren already commissioned as a second lieutenant at the completion of camp in July, is awaiting his branch assignment with the National Guard. In addition to completing Advanced Camp, three cadets participated in the Nurse Summer Training Program, a unique experience that prepares cadets for careers as Army nurses. Cadet Eunice Chanco traveled to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland to complete the summer internship. Cadets Caroline Vining and Sydney McMurrey traveled to Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Fort Belvoir, Virginia to complete the 28-day program. During their time in Fort Belvoir, Vining and McMurrey completed over 156 clinical hours in multiple medical units and participated in a research project. “Training this summer helped me [prepare] for my future as a nurse,” said Vining, who is preparing to graduate in December. “It required me to work in a stressful environment where I was constantly being assessed on my leadership skills under pressure. This helped prepare me for future events where I may be faced with difficult and stressful situations.” Some cadets traveled beyond the borders of the U.S. this summer. Senior pre-med biology major and military science minor Benjamin Kenneaster spent the first part of his summer at Advanced Camp in Fort Knox, he then traveled to Germany to work with the United...

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Miss Search CRU wins Miss MHB 2020
Nov09

Miss Search CRU wins Miss MHB 2020

  17 stunning young women made their way into Walton Chapel Saturday, Nov. 9 to throw their hat into the ring for the opportunity to be crowned Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor for 2020. The show began and contestants introduced themselves, stated their hometown and said something witty regarding where they were from. The talent portion of the pageant featured the contestants’ musical stylings and speeches, with one contestant even shooting arrows to show off her archery marksmanship. There was never a dull moment during the night as contestants sought to show UMHB what they were capable of. They were judged on confidence, creativity, preparation, originality and their overall presentation. “What I liked about the talent portion was all the different things and how all the girls weren’t afraid to express themselves or to step outside the box,” said Hailey Baez, freshman psychology major. “Not only does it show that no one on campus is afraid to be themselves, but also they know everyone wants to see who they truly are. It inspires and encourages people to go out and do what they feel they are good at and have fun doing,” Baez said. Following the talent portion of the pageant, the 17 contestants joined one another on stage to perform a group dance number set to the popular show tune “Don’t Rain on My Parade.” The contestants skillfully and gracefully danced on stage twirling umbrellas. At one point they bounded into the audience, to envelop the crowd in song and dance. The evening gown portion of the show featured the contestants walking with grace and poise to show off their silken and jeweled gowns. During this time, the audience would learn a little bit more about each contestant as they strode elegantly across stage. These contestants were graded on gracefulness, ease of movement in their gowns, color and dress appropriateness and overall impression. From here the top five finalists were narrowed down and thus began their interview from 2019’s Mr. Crusader Knight, Richard Rogers. The answers presented would determine who was to be crowned Miss MHB, and the runner-ups for the position. They were judged on confidence, diction, personality and sincerity of response. This was followed by one last evening gown stroll and heartfelt goodbye with Miss MHB 2019, Briana Fredrickson, as she prepared to hand the crown off to Mary Hardin’s next Pageant Queen. In her farewell address she stated: “To have held the crown as Miss MHB has truly been one of my most treasured experiences and I cannot thank you enough,” Fredrickson said. Overall, the pageant was a stark representation of the heart and passion many of...

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“Sinister:” A perfect film to watch of Halloween
Oct31

“Sinister:” A perfect film to watch of Halloween

If you ask any of my friends, they can all tell you that my favorite holiday is Halloween. I go all out. I watch at least three horror films a week during the month of October. One movie, though, has come back throughout the years. Some watch “Halloween” every October 31, for obvious reasons, but I watch Scott Derrickson’s “Sinister.” Not only is it one of my favorite horror films, but it’s also one of my favorite movies. It’s an understatement to say that Scott Derrickson is talented. Looking at his filmography, there are few movies that are below average. The standouts in his film catalog are Marvel Studio’s “Doctor Strange,” “The Exorcism of Emily Rose” and “Sinister.” Each are very different films and great on their own regard, but I’d argue that “Sinister” stands out above the rest. “Sinister” follows Ellison, played by Ethan Hawke, a murder novelist who moves his family into a new town. The problem, though, is that he moved his family into a house where the family before was found dead. They weren’t just found dead, but the entire family was found hanging from a fallen tree branch. Ellison made the decision to not tell his family about this incident, instead acting like everything was okay. Soon, Ellison finds reels of 8mm film that contains footage of the family who lived in the house previously being hanged and other murders. Slowly, Ellison finds that these murders are connected in a terrifying way. These connections lead Ellison down a dark path as he unravels what is at the heart of the murders. “Sinister” is one of the most tense experiences I’ve had watching a film. The film is unrelenting as it masterfully builds up to scares. Even though they start in a cliché manner, every scare in the film finds a way to twist the cliché in a way that audiences don’t see coming. From the famous lawnmower scene to extremely flexible children, each scare is great in its own right. Oftentimes, horror films rely on loud music and flashy camera tricks to scare audiences, but “Sinister” never pulls away. It racks up the tension by never backing out of a scene until the film feels that it earns its scares. The film, though never graphic, makes you feel every second. Time goes slower watching Ellison sift through the reels of film. Sometimes you may want to look away, but you just can’t bring yourself to. This is a sign of not just a good horror film, but a great one. It’s a masterclass in filmmaking, and one that will haunt your dreams for years....

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