Korean film “Parasite” wins big at the Oscars
Feb25

Korean film “Parasite” wins big at the Oscars

The Academy Awards have come and gone once again, but cinema has been changed forever. One can have optimism that this change is for the better. Oscar-winning director Bong Joon-ho spoke about the Oscars with disdain last year in an interview with Vulture, saying “The Oscars are not an international film festival. They’re very local.” He called the American love for his newest film “Parasite” “strange”. It is strange. American audiences don’t typically watch foreign films. Many Americans claim that they don’t have the attention span to put their phones down and appreciate the film for what it is. Bong Joon-ho also said after winning the Golden Globe for best director earlier this year “Once you overcome the one-inch-tall barrier of subtitles, you will be introduced to so many amazing films”. He couldn’t have been more right. Recently, I’ve started to go through the Criterion Channel, a streaming service of classic films. These classics include the filmography of acclaimed international directors such as Ingmar Bergman and Federico Fellini. Sadly, The Academy has never acknowledged these films. Out of the 92 years of the Academy Awards, only 13 films have been nominated for best picture that weren’t in English. Out of those, none won until this year. This is a reason to celebrate. While Bong Joon-ho never expected to win, he swept the major categories with 4 wins for “Parasite,”: Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best International Film and Best Director. This type of sweep is not typical for the Academy, but much less for an international picture. As film fans, art lovers or people who just want to diversify their cultural appreciation, people everywhere can celebrate these historic wins for Bong Joon-ho and the filmmaking community. All we can do now is hope that the Academy keeps on this track and that this will encourage audiences to watch more international...

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Get involved with intramural sports

On college campuses across the nation, intramural and recreational league sports have become a huge part of campus life as they incorporate community, teamwork, and wellness into students’ lives. Even on small campuses such as the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, intramurals can play a big role in student life. UMHB currently offers six intramural and recreational sports including basketball, soccer, sand and indoor volleyball, football, and the university is open to suggestions from the student body. “Intramural sports at UMHB give me the chance to participate in sports without the big commitment of playing on a varsity team,” junior business major Coby Kidd said. “I love that I can just come together with my friends on a Sunday night and goof around,” she said. Many students just like Kidd have the same feelings towards intramural sports. These programs are the perfect option for students who enjoy exercising and being active but are not involved in varsity sports. Exercise is not the only positive attribution that intramural sports bring to college campuses, they can also be a way to avoid the party scene. According to a 2018 study by Torstveit, Johansen, Haugland, and Stea in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, young adults who participated in organized sports had a lower likelihood of engaging in unhealthy lifestyle choices such as unhealthy dietary habits, low physical activity levels, high screen time, and sleep duration. This study is one example of the positive qualities that intramural sports promote. By students replacing partying with intramural sports on the weekend, college drinking levels can decrease while overall student wellness is improved. A 2007 study in the Journal of American College Health by Ward and Gryczynski found that students who feel pressured by the partying culture, which is cultivated by American pop culture, can use intramural and recreational sports as a positive activity outside of school. Participating in intramural sports can also form a sense of community and friendship with people that would not normally meet. Students create friendships and memories with people outside of their majors, classifications, and social circles. “In high school, I was on the volleyball team and made the majority of my friends that way,” Rachel Lucas, sophomore communications major at Colorado Christian University said. “So when I got to college, I didn’t know if I would find ‘my people’ again. “Joining an intramural volleyball team helped me to form relationships outside of my major and track team. I love my intramural pals,” Lucas said. Intramurals are an easy way to be involved on campus in a casual way. They create a sense of community and fun on...

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Dallas: “Big things happen here”

Dallas, home to many UMHB students, boasts many attractions for the casual tourist or the history buff. From museums to restaurants, gardens to galas and shops to theaters, this bustling city has a lot to offer. For the lover of the arts, there is the Dallas Museum of Art. The exhibit hosts 18th-20th century European and American art, ancient Mediterranean art and art from the Americas, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. In addition, visitors can observe scientists preserving and restoring the museum’s collection with the latest technology in the Paintings Conservation Studio. The new AT&T Discovery District outside of the museum is the perfect destination for food and entertainment. It provides watch parties for sports and local musicians, gallery exhibits and showcases, and diverse meals from destination-worthy food. Downtown, the Dallas Arboretum displays 66 acres of beautiful gardens all year round. It is the home of Dallas Blooms Spring, the largest outdoor floral festival in the Southwest. Tourists can stroll through dainty cottages, meadows of flowers and Japanese-style gardens. If you are feeling a little daring, the Zero Gravity Amusement Park is the only amusement park that features five different thrill rides, this includes the “Nothin’ But Net,” the “Bungee Jump,” the “Skycoaster,” “Texas Blastoff” and the “Skyscraper.” The Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament exists for those fascinated with the culture of the Middle Ages. Costumed knights demonstrate jousting and sword-fighting in an arena similar to what one might expect from that time period. Guests root for the knight of their choice as they enjoy medieval meals served by clever jesters. Finally, Reunion Tower offers a spectacular view of Downtown Dallas. Atop the rotating restaurant, guests get a 360-degree experience of the city. With these tourist spots and many more, it is no wonder that Dallas is the place to be in North...

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The architecture of agility explained: scoring, tumbling, and acrobatics
Dec05

The architecture of agility explained: scoring, tumbling, and acrobatics

UMHB now has an Acrobatics and Tumbling team. But what does that mean? How does that differ from gymnastics in the Olympics? In women’s gymnastics competitions there are three apparatuses used: vault, uneven bars and balance beam. Men’s gymnastics involve parallel bars instead of unevens, and rings instead of the balance beam.) In contrast, acrobatics and tumbling does not involve equipment. Acrobatics and tumbling consist of tosses, tumbling, pyramids and acrobatic lifts. Teams typically compete in six events: compulsories, acro, pyramid, toss, tumbling and a team event. The meets consist of two to four teams competing in head to head and team events. The National Collegiate Acrobatics and Tumbling Association defines acrobatics and tumbling as, “the evolution of different forms of gymnastics.”  Gymnastics is defined as a physical exercise of coordination and strength. A typical meet would go like this: The first event is compulsory. Each team competes with identical previously determined skills with a 10.0 starting value. This skill can be a back salto to ground or possibly a front salto (a flip that does not involve hands) dismount. These examples were used because they are the types of skills that most people think of when referencing gymnastics or similar sports. The second event is acrobatics (often shortened as acro), which is where two to four athletes compete against another team in acrobatic movements. Teams compete to win a total of 30 points in this event. “Acrobatics looks like athletic stuff that is really hard to do, and with just one wrong move something very bad could happen,” freshman pre-med biology major Chloe Wilson noted. Event three is the pyramid; teams compete to win a maximum of 30 points. For this event, teams want to use as few athletes as possible. This can help create more difficult pyramids, thus earning more points. The athletes manipulate their bodies to create the pyramids. Next, there is a halftime of approximately 15 minutes where teams warm-up for the second half of the competition. The team may practice on the practice mats, stretch their muscles or amplify their level of excitement for the next events. The next even is the toss. This event consists of four athletes tossing a fifth athlete in the air, while the fifth athlete completes flips and/or twists forward or backward. Two of the tosses will be solo while the third while is synchronized with another athlete who is being tossed in the air by four athletes of the same team. This event has a possible overall score of 30 points. The fifth event is tumbling. This event has a maximum of 60 points. Athletes have the option...

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Summer filled with training for UMHB ROTC cadets
Dec05

Summer filled with training for UMHB ROTC cadets

Many college students spend their summers making money at a part-time job, going on vacation or simply catching up on much-needed sleep. However, nine of the students in UMHB’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program did something a little different this summer. All nine cadets traveled to Fort Knox, Kentucky to complete Advanced Camp, a month-long summer training program for upcoming seniors. This program is considered to be the most important training event for a cadet, and successful completion of the program is a prerequisite for commissioning as a second lieutenant in the Army. During the Advanced Camp, cadets participate in classroom, field and weapons training, and they learn how to be successful officers. There they are assessed in their leadership skills, and they are tested in their physical skills. “The participants pass a physical fitness test, plus they take part in three road marches of 6, 8 and 12-miles with a 35-lb rucksack (an army version of an oversized backpack),” Senior military science instructor Carl Cook said. “They must complete a land navigation assessment and basic rifle marksmanship as part of nine mandatory requirements.” Advanced Camp serves as the final assessment for senior cadets before they are assigned to a branch of the Army. This year, six UMHB students will commission—one in December and five in May.  Spring UMHB graduate Matthew Boquiren already commissioned as a second lieutenant at the completion of camp in July, is awaiting his branch assignment with the National Guard. In addition to completing Advanced Camp, three cadets participated in the Nurse Summer Training Program, a unique experience that prepares cadets for careers as Army nurses. Cadet Eunice Chanco traveled to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland to complete the summer internship. Cadets Caroline Vining and Sydney McMurrey traveled to Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Fort Belvoir, Virginia to complete the 28-day program. During their time in Fort Belvoir, Vining and McMurrey completed over 156 clinical hours in multiple medical units and participated in a research project. “Training this summer helped me [prepare] for my future as a nurse,” said Vining, who is preparing to graduate in December. “It required me to work in a stressful environment where I was constantly being assessed on my leadership skills under pressure. This helped prepare me for future events where I may be faced with difficult and stressful situations.” Some cadets traveled beyond the borders of the U.S. this summer. Senior pre-med biology major and military science minor Benjamin Kenneaster spent the first part of his summer at Advanced Camp in Fort Knox, he then traveled to Germany to work with the United...

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