Cru soccer survives despite loss
Nov12

Cru soccer survives despite loss

The men’s soccer team winds down its season with many historical firsts, including a spot in the NCAA Division III National Championships in Belton this weekend. Already this year, the Cru set school records for the most single-season victories and clenched its first ever American Southwest Conference Championship in regular season play. “The difference in why this year is so different than past years is in the team,” said head soccer Coach Brad Bankhead. “We have 28 young men believing in each other and the team and accepting whatever role … they might be given and are happy with it.” Last weekend, the Cru hosted its first ASC tournament at home in Belton walking away from the field with a 1-0 victory over Schreiner University on Saturday and a 4-2 loss to Hardin-Simmons University on Sunday after going into double overtime. Sophomore outside midfielder Kyle Dickey said the team performed well. “I think the guys played their hearts out, and that’s all anyone can do,” he said. “We played as a team, and it’s not over. Next year, we are going to win it.” Through the first 110 minutes of the game, both the Cowboys and the Cru remained scoreless. But after a match of penalty kicks, UMHB fell 4-2, finishing the team’s season with a record of 14-3-1 and placing second in the ASC tournament championship. Freshman striker Neiko Camp said it was a character-building experience. “Going through this season has taught me so much about myself and my teammates,” he said. “I’ve learned the true definition of overcoming and what it means to be able to call ourselves a team.” Category leaders for the Cru include Bo Baker, Trevor Shoppach, Kyle Dickey, Vincent Morales, Andrew Carrasco, Daniel Gable and Neiko Camp. Additionally, senior defender Daniel Green and junior goalkeeper Mark Miller were placed on the Academic All-District VI First Team by the College Sports Information Directors of America. Coach Bankhead said the season was overall successful. “I wasn’t sure how this year would turn out. I knew we would be here someday. I just didn’t realize it would be this year. I am excited for those guys who have been here for four years and have seen the transformation of the program and be able to be...

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Acts of silence protest abortion
Oct27

Acts of silence protest abortion

Red duct tape, bracelets and black T-shirts were more than a fad last Wednesday as Crusaders took a stand against abortion by participating in Pro-Life Day of Silent Solidarity — a national movement encouraging people to stay silent for one day. “It was a time for students to give up their voice for all of the unborn children … who will never get to voice their opinion because the decision was made for them,” education major Amanda Willey said. Willey, who helped organize the event, hopes students, no matter their stance on abortion, were influenced by the day of advocacy. “A lot of people on campus are already pro-life, but we want those who are pro-life to have more of a passion for it and be willing to do something about it and speak up,” Willey said. “For those who are pro-choice, we hope that they see the other side — that children do deserve a chance for life. For those who don’t understand much about the situation and the battle, we hope they would … be able to talk to someone about it and develop their own opinion.” Willey hopes to pass her passion onto others. “I desire for everyone to be pro-life. That’s a big goal, but … I believe in pro-life because God, even in the situation of rape or unplanned pregnancies, chose that woman to bare a child that deserves a life,” she said. “God will take a bad situation and turn it to good. A lot of people turn to pro-choice because it’s the easiest way out and they don’t want to deal with it.” A Day of Solidarity was organized by members of Cru for Life which started last semester as a pro-life organization out of the Baptist Student Ministries. “We’re trying to create awareness that there are other options than abortion if a student gets pregnant,” said Dr. George Loutherback, the faculty adviser for Cru For Life. “We’re here to help and provide information.” Loutherback said abortion shouldn’t even be an option. “I believe that men and women have a choice of whether to engage in sexual intercourse. Once they make the choice to do it, the results become the responsibility,” he said. “The choice was sexual intercourse; the responsibility is a pregnancy or sometimes an STD.” Two tables, or Life Stations, were set up in the SUB and in Hardy where officers handed out pieces of duct tape with “life” written on them and pamphlets with information and statistics. Cru For Life also did a diaper and formula drive and sold T-shirts. Profits went to the Hope Pregnancy Center. Freshman nursing...

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Obama visits Texas, speaks on community development

Thousands waved howdy to President Barack Obama when he made his first stop in the Republican-heavy state since his election into office. The president spoke on community development as part of a volunteer team effort with former President George H. W. Bush at Texas A&M University’s campus in College Station Oct. 16. Freshman political science major, Stephanie Taylor, an intern for Congressman John Carter, was invited to the event. “I liked the message of (Obama’s) speech and the encouragement he gave,” she said. “However, it didn’t sound very different from all of his other ‘motivational’ speeches.” Taylor said the audience was receptive to Obama’s ideas, but there were some who disagreed. “The protests paint a picture of the freedom of speech Americans are allowed to have,” she said. Taylor also added that most of the protesters were older citizens. “Young people today seem to not care about anything going on in government. However, in order to maintain the freedoms we have, it is highly imperative for our generation to become actively engaged in the political process. Thomas Jefferson emphasized that a people who are well-informed are a people who can trust and operate their own government,” Taylor said. But some students stood ready to make a difference. “This is the first chance we’ve had to be this close to the president to tell him we don’t agree with what he’s doing and his health care plan, or anything he’s done so far in office,” said Kylie Waylock, a student at the University of North Texas who drove hours to protest at Spence Park were near where the president spoke. “Obama has ignored us … and we’re tired of this.” Waylock and two other students from the University of North Texas wore lab coats as a sarcastic response to a previous presidential speech on health care where administration assistants handed out lab coats to doctors in the audience. “We’re wearing these because if his plan passes and is nationalized, we’ll have a bunch of people running it that don’t know what they’re doing,” Waylock said. “Medicare is bankrupt. Medicaid is bankrupt. Cash for Clunkers never worked out. Social Security is bankrupt. And they want to take on health care; it’s impossible.We can’t afford it.” Waylock, like many other protesters, believes the government health care strategy is a step towards socialism, and will be “more negative than positive in the long run.” Others, like Dan Caniree, disagreed. “This is an event meant to encourage volunteering, so it seems ridiculous that (people) are protesting an event that encourages helping others,” he said. The A&M graduate stood proudly in the swarm of protesters....

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From spiking the points to stocking a local food pantry

This season, the volleyball team is serving more than aces and points — it’s serving the community by volunteering at Helping Hands, a local ministry outreach. The Lady Cru has been serving once a week since August. “Student athletes need to find time to give back to the community,” volleyball head coach Kecia Davis said. It started as a recycling effort, and grew from there. Combining the volleyball and football teams, the Cru uses about 225 plastic bottles a day. “We started off taking our Gatorade and water bottles down to Helping Hands because they re-label them and fill them with laundry detergent,” Davis said. “Every Monday, two of the players go down and wash our bottles and the football team’s.” By the end of the semester, the teams are expected to donate more than 5,000 bottles to the ministry. But more than giving products, the volleyball team gets the chance to physically serve by sorting clothes, stocking shelves and bagging foods. “We go wherever we’re needed,” Davis said. “It’s unbelievable how much we can get done in just an hour.” The team is split into subgroups and visits the ministry at different times throughout the week. Davis said both Helping Hands and the volleyball team are encouraged by the projects. “It’s good to interact with people in the community and become more aware of what we have,” she said. “It’s been a bonding experience for us.” Sophomore biology major and team captain Sara Hayward said volunteering allows players to take the focus off of themselves. “Jesus has called us to take care of the homeless, the widows and the orphans, and this is a chance for us to do that,” Hayward said. “The community is a huge supporter of us and they come to our games, so this is a way for us to repay them for what they’ve given to us.” The team will continue to volunteer at the pantry through the semester, as well as into the spring. Hayward believes it’s been a learning experience. “For me personally, I’ve been blessed with a family who’s been able to give to me almost everything I’ve needed and wanted, so it’s a great opportunity to reach out and become aware of other circumstances,” Hayward said. “It’s a chance to give back to those who aren’t as fortunate.” Freshman nursing major Kaydie Cochran believes volunteering at the pantry gives players a glimpse of life outside of their own. “My heart goes out to those who are less fortunate than I am,” she said. “It’s really been good to open our eyes. We’re always together on and off the court,...

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Social site helps battle poverty
Oct13

Social site helps battle poverty

While social networking is a great method for keeping in contact with friends, it has also become a convenient tool for promoting events and causes like fighting world poverty. “Our goal is to make people aware of the difference they can make,” said Dr. Jim King, dean of the College of Business, who is the administrator for UMHB Against Poverty, a Facebook cause and group. “The thing we want to (do) is stay up with the technology that allows us to communicate with those who are most interested, so Facebook is an important vehicle,” he said. King teaches a freshman seminar class based on social activities with spiritual foundations Commerce and Christ. Last fall, he assigned his students to submit videos about how they could make an impact in the world. “A number of students said it gave them hope to know that they could make a difference now, not just when they graduate,” King said. “I had some freshmen who were really passionate, and this generation is really into being engaged in making a difference and not just talking about it.” Fighting poverty was a key issue that rose to the top of the students’ ideas. A backbone for the effort is sophomore business major Kendall Doles. “Poverty is a lot more present than we think, and it’s one of those things going on around the world that we have the power to change,” Doles said. “We want to start off by making people aware. Awareness leads to action.” Doles is a part of the Facebook leadership team, made up of 14 students with different majors all with a passion for alleviating poverty through various projects. “We’ve had a bunch of ideas and haven’t decided if we want to make it a school organization or not,” Doles said. “But we want to start off by making people aware, like hosting concerts and sending people out on trips.” The UMHB Against Poverty cause was officially launched last spring. “It’s interesting because about this time, we were honoring two graduates, Sam Henry and Jamie Wallace, for their service,” King said. On Oct. 5, the UMHB alumni, Henry and Wallace, launched hopemongers.org, an online donation spot that supports various projects helping the poor. “They were really supportive of us moving forward and an inspiration to students,” King said. “With their encouragement and the interest from some upperclassmen, I set up the cause with the intention of being a student-led group. But it’s not only for students,” he added. “Faculty, staff, alums and friends of the university are welcome to join, too.” The group has more than 420 members already. On the...

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