Teamwork drives successful season for Cru
Nov01

Teamwork drives successful season for Cru

With a perfect record for the season, both overall and in conference, the Cru football team has high hopes of making it far into playoffs. However, the men still have two more conference games to win before the regular season is over. One thing that has aided the season has been their strength in becoming a team and one collective group of athletes. Senior exercise and sport science major and wide receiver Tariekus Ellis said, “Teamwork plays a huge part in our success. We constantly stress to each other that we win by playing ‘together’ on all three phases of the game — offense, defense and special teams.” The goals of the team for the rest of the season are simple. Members want to improve their performance, win the next two games and secure a place for playoffs. Ellis said they want “to get better each week. I know that sounds typical, but that is actually one of our goals. The coaches always tell us we can only control what we do, so we go out every practice striving to improve on the little things and fundamentals.” In the Oct. 22 game against the East Texas Baptist University Tigers, Ellis returned the opening kickoff of the second half 98 yards for a touchdown. The kickoff tied for the second-longest in school history. With the play, Ellis was named American Southwest Conference Special Teams Player of the Week. He said, “It’s a huge honor. I’m just glad I could give the team the spark that we needed to get going. We started clicking after that. The blocking on that play was great and the perfect return call.” Head Coach Pete Fredenburg knows that a few key things about his team have led to the good season. “Number one, we have very dedicated players, and they are very committed to playing at a high level. There is a very high expectation here, not from the coaches, but from the players and that feeds off of itself, and it raises the play for everybody,” he said. Another important factor for the season success has been the coaches who have worked with the players since summer. Fredenburg said, “We are blessed with some outstanding coaches that get them in the right position and help them with their success.” Junior math major and running back Darius Wilson credits a perfect season with the amount of work the team put in at practice each week. “We have been able to win by being consistent with hard work during practice. We overwork our bodies for the upcoming game,” he said. “So when game time is upon...

Read More

Lacrosse club looking for more members

One of the most recently chartered clubs on campus focuses on the sport of lacrosse. On Oct. 11, the Student Government Association allowed the organization to have a school affiliation. One of the members of SGA, junior social work major and Internal Vice President Caitlin Hiett thought the new club would be a good addition to campus. “I saw the passion and love that the students had for lacrosse at the SGA Senate meeting. It could really bring a lot of people together throughout our whole campus,” she said. Heitt saw how important the lacrosse team was at her high school and thinks it will be the same at the university. “In high school, lacrosse was a big deal. Just like intramurals, it brings a lot of people. I think the same support will occur for the lacrosse club,” she said. Freshman psychology major Jonas Lanier is one of the founders. His passion for the sport is what drove him to bring it to campus. “I fell in love with lacrosse five years ago, and I have had so much success due to my teammates pushing me,” he said. “I feel like UMHB needs a new sport to help the other students that have no sport to get out and learn a new sport, meet new people and have fun winning.” Currently the club has 14 members, but they are hoping to grow the group. It would be ideal for the team to have at least 20 players before competing against other schools. Lainer has high expectations and the members that are a part of it. “Most of all is to get as many people around UMHB to be interested in lacrosse. (We want) to win of course, to get people to be able to play as one team and make at least one connection with a teammate or coach,” he said. With the club just recently forming, members know this year will be mostly about getting the basics in order, so in future seasons they can be a competitive team. Lainer said, “First year is getting things together, but next year is championship.” Freshman political science major Jonathan Irish has been playing lacrosse since middle school and is excited that this sport has come to campus. “The club will give the students something new and innovative since lacrosse really isn’t well known to that many people. It also gives guys a different sport to choose from if they want to become involved in a sport on the club level,” he said. Not only does Irish want to be successful with the club, but he also hopes to help...

Read More

Payment for play of college athletes—truth or wishful thinking?

  With top-tier college football and men’s basketball players being estimated at a value to the schools of more than $100,000 per year, there has been talk on whether or not they are entitled to at least a part of that worth. Many people believe that the scholarships students receive are payment enough for all the work and effort they put in. However, some athletes have to live below the poverty line because they don’t have the time to get a job with the number of hours they put into practices and playing games. With each season that goes by, a gap grows between what  student athletes actually need and the scholarships they are receiving. Several questions arise on this issue of universities paying their athletes: Where would the money come from in order to pay the students? Would they pay every player or only the ones who actually played? How would it be possible not to violate Title IX, which regulates scholarships as one of its aspects? One of the reasons people are in favor of paying students is to help them stay in college and not be drafted to the NFL early. Some analysts think it would allow student athletes to obtain their full education before moving on to the professional sport of their choice. However, if students do stay and complete school, they run the risk of injuring themselves and not being able to play after they graduate. This causes many students to accept a draft and not run the risk. Also, if players are paid and don’t have to worry about extra costs that aren’t covered, it could prevent their taking money illegally from agents and/or boosters. This might still occur, but it would help to cut down significantly on  under-the-table money. The issues with staying in compliance with Title IX are the biggest reason that extra scholarships or pay to athletes will most likely not happen. For the majority of universities, the football and men’s basketball programs are the two areas that bring in the majority of the revenue for the athletic department. According to Title IX, all programs would have to increase the scholarships they offer to make programs equal for everyone or cut sports regardless of gender and if they made a profit.  If the schools didn’t do that, their federal funding would most likely be lost. Smaller schools that do not make as much money as large ones would be at a disadvantage. Most athletes would choose to go to the universities that are able to give them good scholarships and additional money to cover all of their expenses rather than...

Read More
New research studies take place
Oct18

New research studies take place

Since the Human Performance Lab began on campus  in 2005, many people have been participating in various studies.  There are three functions of the HPL — to provide a place for exercise science students to learn real job skills, to serve the students, faculty and staff with any kind of health assessments and to conduct clinical research experiments each semester.   Director of the Human Performance Lab Dr. Colin Wilborn said, “Typically most of the studies are going to be carried out by students under my supervision. They will get the publications and present those at regional and national conferences.” Each year, students travel to conferences to present data they have collected from their research.  Although most of the student workers have majors in the exercise and sport science department, junior psychology major Brooke Cox is happy she has the opportunity to work in the lab. “The lab experience is something that is indispensable when I begin applying to graduate school. It will set me apart and show initiative. Aside from putting this on a resume, I love how this job is so structured and prestigious,” she said. “It is an honor to be selected to work for the lab, and it encourages me to work that much harder because I feel I have to keep up. I wouldn’t want to work anywhere else,” Cox said.  Exercise and sport science graduate student Stacie Urbina is an assistant in the Human Performance Lab. She sees the benefit for the school. “Those who are exercise and sport science majors have the opportunity to see how the industry in our field works,” she said. “They can have hands-on experience with supplement companies that contact us to test their products as well as interact with the diverse populations that participate in our studies. For those who aren’t in the EXSS field, they can still gain knowledge and experience from the HPL” This semester four research projects are taking place. “My favorite study right now is the weight loss supplement that we are starting next month,” Urbina said. “It is one of the few studies that we have done that involves the female population. However, I have to admit I may be a bit biased because this study is also my first study to coordinate as a grad student, so it is extra special to me.” Next is a study that is supposed to increase testosterone levels. The third research has the HPL partnering with the women’s basketball team and the supplement beta alanine to increase their ability to build muscle strenght. Lastly, the lab is doing a study with beans. A company has an...

Read More
Race involves past, present Crusaders
Oct04

Race involves past, present Crusaders

The fifth annual 5K and Kid K took place Saturday as part of Homecoming activities. It  allowed area residents and students, faculty, staff and alumni to come together for another campus tradition. Although it was a Homecoming event, this was the first year that the exercise and sport science department hosted the run by themselves. The race was also the first one to be chip timed. In recent years, larger races have gone to this electronic form of measuring so that racers’ times are more accurate. A small chip is attached to the racers’ shoes that corresponds to the participants and the time they cross the finish line. Junior elementary education major and co-president of the Endurance Club Meredith Davis liked having the chips to time the race. “I think it’s really cool, and it makes it a more official race. I know that my time is clocked in more accurately with the chip, and it is more like the bigger marathons and half-marathons,” she said. Davis was the first woman to cross the finish line, and Aaron Miller, junior exercise and sport science major and president of Endurance Club was the first male to finish.   The race started in front of Mayborn Campus Center and was open to anyone who wanted to participate. More than 200 people came out for the event. One of the runners was senior exercise and sport science major Logan Chaney who ran the race because he knows that being fit is an important factor to his degree. “I think it is crucial that we support our major, and if someone is going to be an exercise and sport science major, it is important that they are physically active. Our bodies are our billboards, and physical educators should look like one,” he said.  The event wasn’t just geared toward adults. A Kid K happened right after the regular 5K. Parents  pushed or ran with their young ones, allowing people of all ages to participate. Though many alumni participated, several of the faculty and staff on campus set goals and had been working hard for the race. Exercise and sport science Professor Dr. Jamey Plunk organized the race, with the help of other people in the department. “It is a great opportunity for faculty and staff to come see others who have set this as a goal for them. We have a lot of faculty on campus that have changed their health and exercise habits because they wanted to come do the 5K,” Plunk said. With so many changing their lifestyles, even more people were prompted to take up the challenge. “It has started...

Read More