How to handle a bad living experience

For most students, college is the time when you move out on your own and share a small amount of space with a complete stranger. Why is it that some people just can’t seem to get along with the person that they are temporarily living with? Many students blame the housing process, stating that there just isn’t enough information asked in order to get the perfect match for them. Freshman nursing major Denise Schneider has been rooming with the same person since the start of the fall semester. Her roommate experience has been great so far, and she thinks that others might not be truly  answering the housing questionnaire to the best of their ability. “I think it’s very important that when you’re doing your questionnaire to be truthful and honest. That way you can kind of eliminate some things,” she said. Resident Director Sarah Hammond offers her recommendation when it comes to discussing problems with a house mate. “My biggest advice would be always communicate as openly and clearly as you can. I know a lot of people keep things to themselves and they don’t want to talk about things. They avoid conflict,” she said. Hearing about others having a fight or two with their roommate may scare away some people, but not all students who have decided that it was best to switch roommates think that there is no hope for dorm life. Freshman exercise science pre-physical therapy major Shirley Chan has some advice for first-time college students just now entering the dorms. “I think that if there’s a possibility for them to get to know each other prior to moving in together. I would highly recommend it. Just so the two of you can get to know each other a little bit better and set some ground rules,” she said. It’s understood that some cases cannot be fixed with a mere conversation between two people. However, many students complain about the little things that their roommates do. Such as snoring or throwing a piece of paper on the floor. Hammond believes that students shouldn’t be so worried about the small things and start to live life based on what’s really important to them. “I think we live in a society that is all about me. We want everything for ourselves. We want the best experience for ourselves. We want the best things for ourselves. We think we deserve the best. We just get caught up in complaining, like maybe this isn’t exactly what I wanted …. Well, make the most of it,” she said. She continued to express her opinion about trying to  make the most...

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Students admire different sound

From whimsical to rhythmic sounds, the Waterloo Sound Conspiracy convinced listeners that they could relate to classical music during its concert Feb 2. The ensemble played five pieces with such unique sounds that the audience could not help but be swept up in the moment, whether they were fans of the genre or not. Chair of the music department Dr. Mark Humphrey was hoping that students would be receptive to the ensemble, whose performance was part of the Hillman Visiting Artist series. He said, “I think that sometimes classical music is misunderstood, and I think there are a lot of reasons for that. Some of it is the way that we classical musicians present it. And the Waterloo Sound Conspiracy is trying to change that.” Humphrey wants to give students different experiences with music. He said  the group is trying to send a message through its delivery “that classical music isn’t boring” and that “there’s a young generation of classical musicians who are very interested in keeping this art form alive and exploring new ways to do it.” The group did something that is considered unique to most quintets. Instead of sitting down during their performance, members stood up throughout their time on stage as a better way to communicate with each other and the audience. Before each piece was performed, members took turns explaining the significance of the set that was to be played. One student appreciated this tactic. Freshman exercise and sport science major Ricole Lowe said, “I like how every person has their own role to play in the music and that they introduced the piece and what it was about and they gave information about what we were about to hear. For me, that was really helpful since I don’t have much exposure to classical music.” Students who attended the concert sat down with cautious ears but many were pleasantly surprised to find out that the quintet was able to bring classical music to life in a way that was relatable. Sophomore prephysical therapy major Jacy Mullins said, “I really enjoyed listening to the Waterloo Sound Conspiracy. The ensemble made it easy to forget the fact that I don’t have much experience with that type of music, I was just able to enjoy it.” So the question is, did the group manage to change the minds of UMHB students about classical music? Lowe said, “I really enjoyed myself. I didn’t feel that way coming into the concert. I felt like it was a really good performance. I would definitely go back and see them. I can honestly say that I’m a fan of classical music...

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