Baugh Center for Visual Arts first academic building in Master Plan to open doors
Sep11

Baugh Center for Visual Arts first academic building in Master Plan to open doors

The grand opening of the new Baugh Center for the Visual Arts doesn’t officially occur until Oct. 19, but the building on 9th Street across from the Mabee Academic Center has already opened its doors for the fall semester. Classes began Aug. 20 and many faculty members, along with returning art students, have shown their gratitude for the big change of scenery. Teachers and students were not impressed with the school’s prior art quarters, to say the least. Art professor John Hancock said, “Art was over at Presser Hall in the basement. We had four small rooms we did all of our art classes in. It always flooded (when) we had heavy rain. It was always dark, crowded and dirty.” Sophomore art education major Ashley Lenz, however, seemed to have conflicting feelings about the new facility. “It was mixed emotions. I loved Presser. I only went one year, but I kind of connected to it. Then again, this facility is awesome. So I was really excited to get into a new building,” she said. Chair of the art department Hershall Seals noted that he already sees a strong impact being made. “We’ve had our first week of classes, and our teaching experience has already changed dramatically because of the room to actually create sizable works of art and to have enough floor space for students to actually work,” he said. Art majors are feeling more at home, and Seals hopes this newfound optimism will show in their latest artwork. “I overheard a group of students in the hallway when I walked by. I heard one girl tell another girl, ‘I finally feel like a real university art student.’ To me, that meant so much to hear a genuine response from a student. That confirmed the professionalism of the building and just the high standards that the architects seem to call for,” Seals said. The art center comes equiped with nine major classrooms and four senior studios students can utilize for work on their senior shows, as well as a host of new tools for use on various project. Seals said, “We have been able to purchase a lot of new equipment. We have brand new potter’s wheels, new printing press, and most impressively, we are going to have a brand new bronze foundry area. We’ll also have a new glass blowing area.” Art majors now have 24/7 access to the building, giving them the freedom to work on their projects whenever they’d like. They can scan their school identification cards whenever they need entrance to the building outside of regular class hours. Throughout the semester, there will also be...

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Nurses give back through snacks
Sep11

Nurses give back through snacks

If you’re looking for a quick pick-me-up that will only costs you 50 cents, head over to the snack concession on the second floor of Davidson. Sponsored by the Nursing Student Association, the food stand serves a variety of goods, including soft drinks, popcorn, bottled water and candy. The NSA is an organization that offers opportunities for mentorship and leadership. It not only raises money for nursing conventions, but is a means to give back to the community and members hope someday to help future nursing students with financial aid. J2 nursing major Ana Barefield said, “Our organization seeks out fundraising opportunities that help us pay for nursing students’ costs for events such as Council of Schools where all the nursing schools in the state of Texas gather together for a meeting of the minds. Our organization also sends students to a Texas Nursing Students Association state convention in the spring where students serve as delegates to represent our university,” she said. She hopes that the students who serve will be provided with financial help. “We also hope to eventually be able to provide scholarships that are directly available to UMHB nursing students for books and other costs,” Barefield said. “That is still a work in progress.” S2 nursing major and president of NSA April Lee discussed how the association promotes several events throughout the semester. They include two bake sales and community activities done around the Temple area. “There are so many things we try to sponsor. Right now, we’re raising funds for the Arch of Bell County. We do a Valentine’s Day dance and Halloween dance with them. In the fall toward Christmas, we donate a Christmas tree to Meridian. It’s like a nursing home facility, and the tree is auctioned off and the funds support Alzheimer’s,”she said. NSA also sponsors the Girls Scouts Capstone event in the fall. Adviser of the organization and Professor of nursing Mary Ervi wants students to take on a more active role when it comes to serving the community and see the benefits of joining NSA. “You get some discounts on certain items and reviews for boards. We also provide educational resources for the students. What we like to tell students is that when you go for a job interview and you have on your resume that you were involved, or that you held a board position in the organization … That really looks nice on an application,” she said. Junior nursing major Brittany Haines is thrilled about her decision to become a part of the organization and the opportunities it provides. She said, “I joined because it is a tremendous...

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Day of fun gives students break before finals
Apr24

Day of fun gives students break before finals

Who would ever think that a duck could sport a Mohawk at Play Day this year? Students flocked around the petting farm to play with bunnies and fuzzy chicks. Without having much luck, some even attempted to catch the colorful roosters and the pony with the pink mane stood nearby watching all of the chaos unfold. Some of the other events that were held included: dodge ball, washers, ladder ball and croquet. Among other activities, students were also given the opportunity to participate in paintballing, Segway rides and a mobile zip line. Freshman psychology major Megan Bolger recalls one of the most memorable aspects of Play Day for her. “The snow cones — they had the longest line, and that’s how you knew they were delicious” she said. Bolger liked all of the activities the day had to offer, but one stood out to her the most. “I really enjoyed the inflatable twister. It was a challenge,” she said. Freshman athletic training major Katie Bristo was looking forward to having the day off and was eager to see all of the functions the day had in store. “I had a really fun day. I think Play Day was a success, and it was nice not having class and not having to pay for any of it. I probably enjoyed the paintball the most, but all of it was fun. I really enjoyed the music, dancing and DJs,” she said. Besides the fun factor, Director of Student Organizations Tiffany Wurdemann hopes students are aware of the true intentions. “Other than having a day off, the purpose of Play Day is to remember the reasons why we are here to be in community with one another. It is a long standing tradition that provides the UMHB community an opportunity to put work aside and refocus before finals come,” she said. Wurdemann explained how the events are created. “We have a Play Day committee that is made up of Student Life staff. Each of us have surveyed a variety of students on what they hope to see at Play Day, and we deliberate which activities should be chosen for the day. We also look back in the past on what was successful and reassess if we should bring it back,” she said. The rockslide and the log jammer may have seemed to just pop out of nowhere, but it actually took months for all of the ideas to become a reality. Wurdemann said, “We met a couple times in the fall and a few times this spring. In between our meetings, we would research what ideas could come to life, and which...

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On a mission from God
Mar27

On a mission from God

From Canada all the way down to Panama, the university made a strong impact on many lives this spring break, as several families, faculty members and students chose to go on mission trips. Some of the locations where they served included: Edinburg, Texas; Joplin, Mo.; Haiti; Canada and South Padre Island. The 60 people who traveled to Edinburg devoted their time to speaking about Christ in fast food eateries and flea market settings. They also offered prayers of healing. In Joplin, Gilda and Charles Crabtree helped with the recovery from the tornados by doing several good deeds for the community, such as putting 250 yards of sidewalk in three pivotal locations around the city. Those who traveled to Canada got to learn and study from church planters in the region. Director of the Baptist Student Ministry Dr. Shawn Shannon served on Beach Reach (located in South Padre) during the break, which helped spring breakers and one elderly couple around the area with a variety of tasks. “We provided free rides (to over 1127 people), we shared in providing free pancakes twice a day, we cleaned the main beach one morning, we helped build sand sculptures one day, we pulled our weight in the group chores, we had conversations on the vans and on the beach, and we had three baptisms, 11 new believers and 16 rededications.  We also helped an elderly couple move couches on our way back,” she said. Sophomore exercise and sport science major Elizabeth Valcin also went to South Padre during the break. It was her first time on a mission trip. “At first, I wasn’t sure if I was supposed to go, but the Lord kept on pushing me to go, so I went,” she said. Freshman nursing major Hannah Settles decided to spend her break doing something with a purpose. It was her first time serving missionally in Haiti as she helped build a wall along with the others who traveled to the country during the break. “I didn’t want to (waste) another spring break when I could be out serving and making a difference,” she said.   Freshman sport management major Braxton Tucker saw this as the perfect opportunity to revisit Haiti. It was his second time visiting the country. The first was before the 2009 earthquake. “I’ve had a passion for serving missionally since the seventh grade when I got to go see the devastation in New Orleans. I’d gone with Hope for the Hungry once before, and I knew, coming to UMHB, I would get another opportunity to go. They needed more guys, and I guess that’s when it opened the...

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Scholar’s Day offers chance to showcase research

Scholar’s Day is right around corner, and this year one lucky student will leave with a special treat: a Kindle Fire. The event will be held Monday, April 23, and students are encouraged to submit applications, which have a deadline of March 9. It is an annual event during which undergraduates and graduate students present research projects they’ve been working on throughout the previous year. Scholar’s Day was founded four years ago by the College of Sciences. Assistant Professor and Chair of the psychology department Dr. Trent Terrell explained the reasons behind the event. “We wanted to give UMHB students the experience of making a professional presentation. Additionally, we wanted to create an environment where students could receive constructive criticism about their work,” he said. “Our goal with Scholar’s Day was not only to give students an opportunity to showcase their work, but also an opportunity to learn how to make effective presentations.” UMHB Alumna Julie Kroetz participated in the event last year. “It was a lot of work, but very satisfying. Dr. Terrell made it part of my independent study class. I learned how to prepare a poster and answer questions about my studies,” she said. The research project was a study about memory. “I worked hard for months getting all of my data ready to make a poster. It took me one year from start to finish. I did an eye witness memory study, and also passed out questionnaires to 96 students poling 88 questions about habits students are involved in and how they compare to the average,” she said. Terrell is hoping that students will not only see the event as a fun opportunity to learn something new, but also as a challenge that will help them in real life situations. He talked about what is expected from each person who participates. “Scholar’s Day requires students to complete all the steps that would be necessary for them to present at a conference, including identifying a research topic and conducting the research for their project, completing an application form and writing an abstract and ultimately creating posters or paper presentations and giving them publicly,” Terrell said. He believes everyone can learn from attending the event, including students who are not presenting. “Students attending the event will have an opportunity to see posters and hear presentations on a variety of topics. We hope that students will not only learn a lot from their peers but also become inspired to conduct their own research and make presentations in subsequent years,” he said. As for the poster session, students will present their work at the Lord Conference Room from 1:30...

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