Art exhibit inspires students
Oct30

Art exhibit inspires students

Aesthetic Construction, the artwork collection provided by Jeanne and Larry C. Moseley was opened Oct. 25 in the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts. Larry Moseley is a principle architect with GSC Architects. Moseley and his wife started collecting art in 1969. The exhibition came into being when Moseley and his wife discussed their interest in the arts with Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts Ted Barnes and professor and chair of the department of arts Hershall Seals during the construction of the new art building, which Moseley helped to design. Barnes thinks the exhibit can inspire people to start a collection of their own without having to go over their budget. “I hope students get the idea that you can have a passion for something like the arts. You can start even as a student and begin collecting art because you can buy things at prices that are fairly reasonable. I also hope that they get the idea that you can be passionate about any of the arts as well. You can be passionate about culture and the arts and follow that dream,” he said. Along with the affordability, Seals enjoys the emotions conveyed in the pieces of artwork shown. “What I like about the collection is the variety. They have a lot of abstract work, but then they also have a lot of realistic work. There are some landscapes that are absolutely beautiful. They give a sense of life; they’re intimate and quiet. Then, they have other works that are big, bold and highly colorful,” he said. Because of the gallery’s convenient location, students can use this opportunity to incorporate what they see in the art exhibition into their own work. Seals said, “Students that are in painting classes, especially since there’s a lot of painting in this collection, will be able to find something that they can relate to. There’s something for everyone in this exhibit, and it’s fun to have it right next to the art studios where teachers and students can just come in here and look at a few things and get inspired.” Art majors won’t be the only ones benefiting from the event. Students experiencing art gallery work for the first time will be able to develop a better understanding for the arts. “Just the community at large, no matter what their age, will find wonderful narratives in this collection of art,” Seals said. “It’s a chance to use your imagination and interpret the works, and just kind of live with the visual arts for a short time and let your mind go to those places that are not...

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Families come to visit Cru
Oct16

Families come to visit Cru

Parents and siblings gathered around the campus recently to visit their Crusaders for a weekend of fun in a friendly atmosphere. Family Weekend is a tradition that perhaps isn’t as defined as some of the older ones at the university, but it has been around for a while. “I must say that this event is something there is not much history about,” Museum Curator Betty Sue Beebe said. “It seems that in the beginning, it may have been called Parents Weekend and may have been initiated by a parents’ organization. Dr. Bill Muske, former director of church relations, and his wife, Jan, were among the first leaders of that organization,” she said. Whatever the case may be, the event has grown into quite a tradition. Vice President for Student Life Dr. Bryon Weathersbee explained why. “Family Weekend gives our moms, dads, stepmoms, stepdads, grandparents, aunts and uncles the opportunity to come and experience life at UMHB,” Weathersbee said. “They get to experience the academic side by meeting the faculty. They get to experience the social side by all of the different things we have going on.” The weekend allows families to see a glimpse of life on campus. “It’s a microcosm of what goes on in the life of a student’s semester, and we bring families in so they can experience the Crusader spirit,” he said. This year, students and their families participated in a pep rally, a tailgate party and were given the chance to watch some of the Cru athletes in action. The Baugh Center for Visual Arts gave tours, and a concert was held at the Hughes Recital Hall. Weathersbee has three children of his own and believes Family Weekend gives parents a chance to see what their children are doing. “From a parent’s standpoint, it allows families to enter into the world of their student, and we, as parents, miss them,” he said. Junior pre-physical therapy major Jacy Mullins has been at the university since last August. A native of Sweeny, Texas, Mullins lives too far away to see her family on a regular basis. “I’m really close with my family, so it’s tough having to leave them during the fall. Family Weekend gives me the opportunity to spend time with them and catch them up on new things that are going on at school,” she said. Mullins enjoys including her family in all things school related. “It’s fun to see how they interact with my friends and the campus. I just love being able to share this part of my life with them,” she said. Weathersbee is confident Family Weekend will continue to have...

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The Walking Dead brings TV to life
Oct16

The Walking Dead brings TV to life

Rick (Andrew Lincoln) and the survivors are back in the third season of The Walking Dead along with the flesh eating zombies and the unsightly image of rotting corpses. The AMC zombie drama returned Oct 14. Based on the comic book series with the same name, The Walking Dead tells the story of a group of survivors trying to live through the aftermath of a zombie apocalypse. For those of you who need a reminder on what events took place last year, here’s a recap. The second season began with Rick and the survivors escaping the CDC. The group travels to Fort Benning and gets stuck on Interstate 85. Sophie (Madison Lintz), Carol’s (Melissa McBride’s) daughter is chased out into the woods and the survivors break out into search parties only to find out later she has turned into a zombie. The search for Sophie leads the group to finding refuge at a nearby barn unaware of the fact that walkers are being hidden in a nearby stable. Halfway through the season, Rick finds out that Lori (Sarah Wayne Callies) is pregnant with their second child. The twist is the baby could be either Rick’s or Shane’s (Jon Bernthal). Shane’s obsessive behavior toward Lori becomes out of control, forcing Rick to kill him during the penultimate episode of the series. Season two ends with viewers watching as Rick reveals to the survivors the secret Dr. Jenner told him toward the end of season one – all of the survivors are infected. Some new characters come into play this season including The Governor played by David Morrissey and Michonne played by Danai Guria. Season three picks up with Rick and the other survivors finally making it to the prison that was seen on the last episode of last season after jumping from house to house. The episode also establishes that Rick and Lori are barely on speaking terms. They decide to clear out the prison so Lori can have a safe place to have her baby. Andrea (Laurie Holden), who was presumed dead, is reintroduced to the storyline with newcomer Michonne who rescued her last season. The new episode didn’t spend too much time with them, but it is clear that they’ve developed a strong bond and have come to rely on each other. Andrea also seems to be suffering from some sort of ailment. The prison isn’t what it’s expected to be. The group gets attacked by walkers right off the bat and Hershel (Scott Wilson) ends up getting his leg amputated by Rick because of being bitten by a walker. The premier ends with Rick and the others...

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Campus professor gives voice to the deaf
Oct02

Campus professor gives voice to the deaf

The school is digging deeper into the world of American Sign Language through new assistant professor of the modern foreign language department Parker Kennedy. Kennedy was born without the ability to hear and has a no-voice policy in his classes. He hopes to use his firsthand knowledge of ASL as a way to help guide his students. “The challenge is to get the students accustomed to the new language without much interaction with its culture. We come up with creative ideas using technology to increase the students’ learning experience. My goal is for them to be able to interact with deaf people in a natural environment,” he said. Freelance sign language interpreter Camille Beckham helps interpret for Kennedy during special events. She points out the most common assumption about ASL. “It’s a completely different language. The grammar is different and the structure is different. American Sign Language is a three-dimensional language. Spoken languages, like English or French are linear languages, meaning you can only be making one sound at a time. Basically you can only be saying one word at a time. In ASL, you are using the space around you,” she said. Beckham has been signing for 29 years and has been certified as an interpreter for 23. Over the course of her career, she has learned that every gesture is significant. “One hand can be doing one thing, and the other hand could be doing something else. The speed that you’re signing has meaning. The tilt of your shoulders has meaning. What your eyebrows are doing has meaning. Your eye gaze has meaning. Which direction your eyes are looking and what your mouth is doing have meaning,” she said. ASL is unlike any other form of speech and is incomparable to other languages. “There are so many things going on at once that have meaning. There’s no way you can just map it directly onto English word for word,” Beckham said. The university’s ASL program has been around for approximately seven to eight years. Along with the help of teacher’s aides, Kennedy uses special methods to instruct his class. He said, “My interaction with the students depends on their signing aptitude. I mainly use visual aids, such as dry erase boards and PowerPoint to do my instruction. In the class, there’s a no-voice policy.” Senior Christian ministry major Shawn Cain works with Kennedy and has been signing for three years. He knows students can gain a lot more from the ASL program than just the ability to sign. “They can learn about the world, the culture, the life behind ASL and the deaf community. They can learn...

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Hillman Series showcases talent

The Hillman Visiting Artist series kicked off Sept. 27 at Hughes Hall. The Carpe Diem String Quartet took to the stage alongside world-class bandoneon player Raul Jaurena, who specializes in the genre of tango. The quartet and Jaurena played a rendition of works by Antonio Vivaldi and Astor Piazzolla with a tango influence. The performance also included UMHB Assistant Professor Michelle Schumann who was the featured pianist of the recital. Schumann has been playing with Carpe Diem for five to six years and enjoyed seeing how the audience reacted to the upbeat presence they had on stage. “The Carpe Diem String quartet is very energetic when they perform. Classical music often gets an unfair reputation of being boring, so it’s really great when we can see world-class players up on stage who are super energetic. This quartet really brings a different kind of vibe to classical music,” she said. In 2007, Jaurena won a Latin Grammy for his album titled I Love Tango. Schumann got the chance to meet and work with him a few years ago prior to performing with him at the Hillman Series. “What I love about him as a player is that he plays with such overt expression. When he plays, you feel that he is telling you a story, and you’re completely sucked into the world that he is creating on his instrument. The sounds that he creates on the bandoneon are really beautiful, and listening to him can transport you to all of these amazing places,” she said. Sophomore finance major Kristina Liu is a fan of classical music. The concert was her first time hearing Jaurena and the Quartet perform together. “I thought it was fantastic. I liked the line-up. I like how they alternated the classical Four Seasons with the tango Four Seasons. I thought it was a really good way to arrange the program. I was very curious about the bandoneon player because I never experienced that before,” she said. Many students who may not be familiar with the classical music left Hughes Hall that night with a brand new outlook on the genre. Junior nursing major Chelsea Kosar, who attended the concert out of curiosity, said, “I actually had a good time tonight. I was surprised at how much fun I ended up having. Classical music isn’t something that I would normally listen to, but I found myself really getting into it as time went on.” Schumann was pleased with the outcome of the concert. She said, “If students are experiencing a concert like this for the first time, I’m hoping that whatever expectation they have for a “classical”...

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