Crusaders seal their mark on stadium by signing steel
Apr17

Crusaders seal their mark on stadium by signing steel

With the new stadium in its final construction stages, Crusaders had the opportunity to leave their own personal mark on the structure. Students, faculty and staff were given markers to sign one of the steel beams meant for the highest point of the new facility. Students from all over campus stopped by the alumni center parking lot between 8 and 11 a.m. to participate in the steel signing. Crusaders snapped pictures to capture the moment and keep the memory of the day fresh in their minds. Junior pre-physical therapy major Jacy Mullins shared the experience of the event with a few close friends. “I felt like it was a great way to leave my mark on campus, and it was something I will always remember doing,” she said. “I think students were excited to sign the steel because it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Some of my friends didn’t care to join in signing (it), but the ones that did were really excited to do it.” To people who attend the university, the occasion was more than just adding their names to a steel beam. Some left Bible scriptures. Others left anonymous drawings. But the bottom line was  the students got to create their own little piece of history. This specific event was a rare opportunity. “There aren’t many times that a college does remodeling of their campus and allows you to do something like this. So, it was a way that we could all leave our mark on campus. Other people may never see those signatures, but we will always know that we signed that steel and can say that ‘my name is in the football stadium,’” Mullins said. But why would signing an inanimate object that will never be seen have such an impact on the campus? Mullins thinks this is a great way to leave a lasting legacy after graduation. “Students associated signing the beam as making history because our signatures are going to be on that piece of steel forever now. It’s something that other generations and other classes of UMHB can look at,” she said. Museum curator Betty Sue Beebe said the event is valuable to all Crusaders because it is a time of growth and progression for the university. Beebe is an alumna of the school and participated in the activity. “All of us who signed our names are a part of significant history of UMHB.  This is an important time for us to be students, faculty, staff and administration.  As time moves along, we can look back and feel good about our participation in this event,” she said. Director of alumni relations Rebecca...

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New graduate programs added

Last fall, the graduate school had an enrollment of 363 students, and during the spring the numbers remained strong with 351. The university is expecting a drastic increase in these demographics with the development of new programs. The graduate school has announced the beginnings of a new Doctor of Physical Therapy program expected to start in the fall of 2014. Also, two new tracks, Leadership in Nursing Education and Education and Sport Administration, will be included in the Doctor of Education and Master of Science in Education degrees. What is the significance of these programs being offered now? Dean of the graduate school and Associate Professor of exercise and sport science, Dr. Colin Wilborn, explains it’s all about figuring out which programs will be best suited for the university, which has taken two years of consideration. “We believe it fits our mission with service. Clearly, physical therapists in their profession are all about service, so it fits with our mission in that way. It allows us to reach a completely different population of students that we haven’t had before. It allows us to spread our reach as Christian higher education,” he said. Wilborn anticipates a boost in job opportunities for graduate students in upcoming years. We know the need for physical therapists over the next 10 years is going to increase to 40 percent; job placement is currently 99 percent. So, we know that our graduates are going to have good jobs. They’re going to have good jobs quickly and that they are also the new population of Mary Hardin-Baylor,” he said. With terminal degrees in nursing education so hard to find at other schools, Wilborn said that including the Ed.D track at the university will fill a void to educate nurse leaders. The program will help nurse educators learn new skills and prepare them to be better teachers. Prospective graduate students will have plenty of interesting occasions to look forward to.. “They’ll have the opportunity to go to Austin the first summer to be involved in some of the legislative issues that are affecting nursing education. The second summer, they’ll be able to go to Washington and get on a deeper level legislatively with what’s going on in nursing education and how they can make a difference with that,” said Associate Professor and Director of the master’s of science and nursing programs Dr. Carrie Johnson. She also said students involved in the new nursing track will get the chance to study abroad at a later time. With the DPT program being largely based on clinical experience, students interested in the new degree will get a chance for research...

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Should The Last Exorcism be cast out of theaters?

The Last Exorcism Part II picks up right where the original left off. Nell Sweetzer (played by Ashley Bell) is the only individual left after the cult ceremony toward the end of the first film. Sweetzer travels to a home for recovering victims and begins to pick up the pieces. She tries to make a new life for herself, which includes a new job and a possible romantic interest. Just as Nell begins to forget the horrifying events of her past, the evil that once possessed her comes back for more. Nell soon realizes she must partake in another exorcism, but just like the first time, the situation doesn’t go as planned. The events that follow are even more terrifying than anyone could ever imagine. The film has an overall MPAA rating of PG-13 for horror violence, terror and brief language. Directed by Ed Gass-Donnelly, the movie also features Spencer Treat Clark (who played Lucius in Gladiator), Julia Garner and Judd Derek Lormand (who played Officer Darrell Lino in Joyful Noise). Bell’s most recent projects include: The Black Tulip, Sparks, The Bounceback and The Marine: Homefront. Unfortunately, The Last Exorcism Part II takes a major step back from the original film. The plot is so overused and washed up. Not even the few cheap jump scares can save the movie. Even though Bell is spot- on with her acting, it’s just not enough to make an average thriller extraordinary. The Last Exorcism was interesting and kept viewers guessing until the very last scene. As for Part II, well, the trailer is as good as it gets. The sequel is predictable and downright boring. The film closes without a solid ending, leaving room for a third movie, but if I were the director, I would just close the door on the franchise now before it turns into another cheesy Paranormal Activity series. If you’re looking for an even scarier version of the first film, you won’t find it here. Don’t waste money going to see the sequel. You’ll be left disappointed and wishing you had rented it at the nearest Redbox...

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Historical fun in downtown Belton
Mar14

Historical fun in downtown Belton

Over the weekend, students are used to traveling back home or visiting their favorite hangouts around the Belton area. But besides the everyday coffeehouse, or the recently built movie theater down the street, so many buildings around this small town are left untouched and ready to be explored by    Crusaders. Take Cochran, Blair and Potts, for example. This building is the oldest family-owned department store in Texas. The building has been around for almost 144 years and includes a historical museum upstairs above its main floor. In the museum, you can find old mannequins that were used to display clothing and old log books. Owner and president of Cochran, Blair and Potts, Rob Potts has worked at the store for 40 years. He says the books were used to keep records of every customer and sale during that time. He continues to add to the museum, not just with artifacts left in the store, but also with goods brought in from the people of the community. “Whenever we get something…we’ll either have something we find down here (in the store) we want to put up, or people bring stuff that they may have gotten from the store 50 years ago,”        he said. Potts is the sixth generation to work at the store. It was founded in 1869 by his great, great, great-grandfather Col. H.M. Cook, who originally named the store Cook Mercantile Company. Today, various products are sold, including clothing, shoes, assorted candies      and statues. Potts said December is the busiest time of year for the store, with customers looking for unique gifts. The customer favorite is the various types of cowboy boots located in the store’s shoe department. Potts said the clothing section is also a big hit with shoppers. The store offers ladies’ and men’s departments. Even after working at the same place for so many years, Potts finds his career to be satisfying. “It’s a unique job. I like it. I like all of the people who I’ve met over the years and gotten to know. They’re not just customers, but they’re friends. So, that’s been rewarding. There’s not a lot of stores left like this anymore,” he said. Not only will first-time shoppers leave the store with fun new trinkets to enjoy, but they will also get to experience a taste of some good old-fashioned Texas history. “I think everybody likes it. It’s not anything you really see anymore because there’s not that many stores left like this. It’s something I thought we needed to do to kind of help preserve history,” Potts said. Similar to Cochran, Blair and Potts, the Bell County Museum has...

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University site gets face-lift

The university community received a surprising email last week giving the details on a new design for the school’s official website. The message promised Crusaders a fresh, modern look as well as better support for mobile devices and other electronic gadgets. What brought about all of these changes, and does the new site really live up to the hype? Because of the decision to improve, renovations began in the summer of 2012.  According to web services manager Matthew Irvine, there were four reasons for the change. “The first one was that it wasn’t mobile optimized. That’s kind of the biggest emphasis for re-launching the website. On the old version, you had to really work to be able to get the content that you wanted,” he said. Twenty-five percent of devices accessing the website are mobile applications, and the percentage is steadily increasing. The second problem was navigation. Last year, a survey  among students showed that people had a hard time making their way around the website. “Eighteen percent of the navigation tests resulted in the user having difficulty getting to their intended location. If you wanted information on an academic program, for instance, you would have to know what college that academic program belongs to in order be able to navigate to it. So, we wanted to reduce the difficulty in navigating between different areas of the site,” Irvine said. Other factors involved with the decision to remodel were based on intuition and aesthetics. Irvine explained the site needed to be easy for people to find what they’re looking for. To fix this problem, sections of the site were moved to a drop-down menu. Before the renovation, most users were greeted with a bright yellow background when visiting the official home page. With help from webmaster Lucy Hutcheson, the layout was changed to a more toned-down look, making it easier for viewers to scroll through content. The biggest new feature of the site is its mobile-friendly aspect, and it also comes with a few extra neat tricks. Irvine said, “The sliders we have are touch-enabled. You can flick with your finger if you’re on a touch-enabled browser. We’ve done a lot of work on the faculty and staff profiles to make them friendlier to users. Mostly, it all boils down to the fact that it works on every screen size.” Associate Vice President for Information Technology Brent Harris said the newly designed website is now able to reconfigure to whatever size device is accessing the site. It will not load differently on a smartphone or a tablet. The content is the same, with only the layout adjusting. There’s still...

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