Too busy

Saying “yes” is easy, especially when asked to take on a specific task. When it comes to being in college (especially the first year), students are encouraged to get involved, not only for the purpose of meeting new people, but to seek what truly grabs an individual’s attention so he or she may follow matters of the heart. Yes, it is important to plug in to different organizations, but how much is too much? Now, don’t think this is to call anyone out for being “over involved.” If that were the case, the big fat plank would need to be taken from this very eye, but being busy besides school work wasn’t always the case. For freshmen or transfer students, being away from home and family is scary. Shyness often replaces confidence, and the first year at UMHB can become more intimidating. Needless to say, after finally getting out of the comfort shell, students find that activities become their new home. The semester is jam packed with school work, various campus activities and sometimes a part-time job. Students should pursue what they love most, and do it with all they have. But when it becomes too much, they should not be afraid to say no. Mistakes are easily learned from. Many students tend to overload themselves during their first year because it seems like a good way to start. Junior theology/philosophy and history major Curtis Landrum took full advantage of joining many organizations on campus. He became freshman class president for the Student Government Association, took part in Student Foundation, Reaching Out, served on the Play Day committee, directed and choreographed the freshman class for Stunt Night, directed Sader Puff and was part of the Honors Program. To say the least, Landrum had a lot on his plate. “I felt strung a lot thinner than I wanted to be,” he said. “I got tired of not being able to do things that I wanted to do and needed to do because I had to attend some monotonous meeting or lengthy event.” He came to realize these activities were “more of a chore and less of an honor.” Meetings weren’t productive because he wanted to use that time for other activities. Many students continue to fill their activity plates because they enjoy the busy, hectic lifestyle of living by a planner. And that is perfectly fine. When seeking true passions, stick to what you know. If you’re meant to be in a certain organization, it will  happen. Landrum encourages students to venture off campus and see what else the world offers. “I think there is only so much we can...

Read More
New apartments to overlook creek
Jan25

New apartments to overlook creek

Last semester, the master plan to expand campus was proposed, and it didn’t take long for the first building project to begin. Construction is officially underway for the new apartments on University Drive — the first of campus housing located on the west side of the street. “We have started moving dirt to prepare,” Vice President of Student Life Dr. Bryon Weathersbee said. “You may have seen the white houses being moved across from the band practice parking lot .… that’s where they will go.” The new building is estimated to cost $7 million and will sit on 3.7 acres overlooking Nolan Creek. “If you have ever been to the president’s home and stood on his back porch, it will almost be the same view … just not with the same home cooking our first lady provides,” he said. Campus housing has been completely filled up (including the 141 beds in Garner Hall added in fall 2010). As the number of students increases each year, the need for new housing grows. Because of the new addition, 166 more students can live on campus. “Although this seems removed from campus, it is actually closer to Walton Chapel than Garner Hall is to Walton,” Weathersbee said. A variety of floor plans is available. The four-story 68,500 square foot complex will hold 59 apartment units. All will have a private room/private bath and share a common living area. Thirty-one units are for two people: two bedrooms and two baths available, eight units for three people: three bedrooms and three baths and 20 units are four bedrooms and four baths for four people. Each apartment will have a washer and dryer, microwave, refrigerator, garbage disposal, along with wi-fi, cable and data ports in each of the bedrooms and living areas. Junior  theology/philosophy and history major Tyler Potts is apprehensive of UMHB’s new addition. “I think having individual (private) bathrooms in every room is a massive inconvenience,” he said. “It takes up bed space that could be used to house more students who are usually forced out of campus housing.” Potts, however, is ready to see the campus atmosphere improve. “A lot of students are really excited about having their own bathroom,” he said. Freshman graphic design major Jacob Brenton is one of those. He thinks the private bathroom “would be nice for the women folk.” The ability to socialize, then retreat to a single room is appealing to him. “I think the possibility of living in an environment with a lot of your friends, but still having your private space is a really nice balance,” he said. This is the first step to...

Read More
Annual food drive hopes to collect over one thousand canned goods for Helping Hands
Nov16

Annual food drive hopes to collect over one thousand canned goods for Helping Hands

A campus-wide canned food drive called Cru Can takes place annually for providing goods to a local charity, Helping Hands. The Student Government Association, heads up this week-long drive for students to get involved and serve a community in need. Last year, UMHB and Hardin-Simmons University competed to see who could raise the most canned goods. Alumna and former SGA member Lauren Allen remembers the hours of work that went into organizing the first Cru Can drive. “I helped with putting out all the collecting receptacles and helped count the cans,” she said. “Because I worked with Kristy Brischke in the student organizations office, I had to take all the items that weren’t cans and take them to Hope for the Hungry so they could give those things to the community,” she said. The event is worth getting competitive about, and this week it takes a different spin from last year. Sophomore Christian ministry major Ryan Murphy said this year HSU wasn’t able to participate. “This is our second annual Cru Can,” he said. “It differs from last year in that we are competing student organizations and residence halls.” Over 2,000 pounds of canned goods were given to Helping Hands last year. “I came up with the idea to have a campus competition because I knew Helping Hands appreciated the food drive last year,” he said. “And this year it’s based off of the number of cans, so I would love to see over 1,000 cans collected among the organizations.” Youth ministry major and senior class president Bethany Carter knows the importance of reaching out and giving to the community. “It’s very important …. This is a chance for students to do something together to impact someone’s life,” she said. “It’s an amazing way to get involved and feed someone who may not eat otherwise.” She questions if the university wants to be known as a community “who gathers together for the good of those around us.” Carter said, “Without student involvement, this won’t be...

Read More
Creating a new Campus Plan
Nov16

Creating a new Campus Plan

Imagine this: a brand new nursing building that sits across from York Science Center; a three-story student union building combined with a performing arts center that backs the visitor side bleachers of a brand new football stadium between the Musick Alumni Center and Museum and Mayborn Campus Center. It’s all part of the proposed campus masterplan. The new Student Union Building is projected to be the ultimate center for socializing, doing homework and eating meals from choice chain restaurants. UMHB is growing and aiming to be the choice Christian university in Texas. To make room for incoming students in the dorms, the Nolan Creek area is purposed as the future landscape for upperclassmen to call home. The new apartment-style living project will begin within the next month and will be complete for move-in the fall 2011 semester. Expansion of campus has been an ongoing process for the university’s administration. Accommodating a larger student body does mean developing President Dr. Randy O’Rear and the Board of Trustees have been carefully planning the university’s future, knowing nothing will be set in stone until an official meeting that will take place in 2011. “We do anticipate putting the final version of the plan in front of the Board of Trustees for a vote in their February meeting,” O’Rear said. As the president, O’Rear knows not everyone will be pleased with the final decision. The budget for the projects will be several million dollars. The administration is adamant about fulfilling a specific vision for the university. “If you don’t have the facilities to accomplish that vision, or even have a plan … this campus eventually has to look like a place that could be the university of choice for Christian higher education in the Southwest,” O’Rear said. The only set project so far is the new apartment complex. The finalization of a nursing building, SUB, performing arts center and football stadium will not be determined until February 2011. “The top priority after the new apartments is a new nursing building, and we do have a planning team that has recently been put together to select an architect that will start making progress in designing a new nursing building,” he said. Many students who attended the town hall meeting in October are eager to see change. “With the income of $62 million a year, in the next five years we are going to be spending $70-80 million on the new facilities, and I don’t understand how we’re going to be able to afford it,” junior accounting major Bob Beckworth said. However, Beckworth trusts the research behind the new project. “I really do like the...

Read More
Rangers overcome critics, youth to play in series
Nov02

Rangers overcome critics, youth to play in series

The New York Yankees forked out $206 million to their players this year, taking the number one spot on MLB team salary rankings for 2010 — and that’s the only first place the Yankees will get credit for this year. Texas Rangers’ closer 22-year-old Neftali Feliz shocked Yankee nation when strike three, an outside breaking ball, buzzed past Yankee third baseman Alex Rodriguez to clutch the pennant, moving the team to face the San Francisco Giants in the 2010 World Series. With an overall team salary  less than half that of the Yankees, and never succeeding in a single American League Division series, the Texas Rangers are living proof that anything is possible. Some students may support the franchise by wearing T-shirts and painting faces but die-hard fans and siblings Sam and Rachel VanHoozer show their loyalty by road tripping with their family to Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. Sam is a junior exercise sports science major, and Rachel is a freshman nursing major. “I grew up a Rangers fan and have been going to games since I was very little,” Sam said. He doesn’t recall his exact age when he began attending the games or how many times he’s been to the ballpark, but he does “remember watching the older guys like Juan Gonzales and Ivan ‘Pudge’ Rodriguez play,” he said. “My Dad has always been a season ticket holder, so I would go every chance I could.” Rachel began attending games just last year, and so far this season, the VanHoozers have attended about 12 games. Together, their favorite memory was witnessing the team clinch the American League Champion Series. “I’ve been to a ton of Ranger games, but the celebration and atmosphere after that win was like nothing I’ve ever been a part of,” Sam said. The two share the same favorite player, center fielder Josh Hamilton. He was awarded MVP of the ALCS game. “He’s come from so much,” Rachel said, “And he’s made the team stronger.” “He’s an amazing player and has been through nothing you would ever imagine,” he said. “If you haven’t read his book, I really encourage you to read it …. He gives all he has each game and gives all the glory to God every single night,” Sam said. The VanHoozers were in Arlington Oct. 30, and weren’t the only Crusaders there. Senior business management major Grant Coomes and his dad, Kenny Coomes, had the honor of holding the American flag before the Rangers and Giants took the field. The opportunity came about when the Rangers front office emailed all season ticket holders, giving them an option to volunteer to...

Read More