Scholars’ Day will showcase research work
Apr12

Scholars’ Day will showcase research work

There is one day of the year when undergraduate and graduate students get to present their research projects. Scholars’ Day will be here Monday, April 18. In 2009, the very first event, which was created by the College of Sciences took place to allow students to demonstrate their work and encourage more of their peers to get involved in doing research. Psychology Professor Dr. Trent Terrell is serving as the chair of the event’s committee. The previous chair, Dr. Isaac Gusukuma, helped create the event along with Dean of College of Sciences and Interim Dean, College of Humanities, Dr. Darrell Watson, whom Terrell gives full credit to for making Scholars’ Day what it is today. “One of the goals of Scholars’ Day is to provide undergraduate researchers with an opportunity to present their work to others in a conference-like setting,” he said. The planning committee “hopes the experience will teach students about the process of applying to conferences and will prompt them to submit proposals to other events in the future,” Terrell said. “(They) review proposals and provide feedback  to the students.” Terrell is prepared. He has organized, collected and planned various locations around campus for hosting the event. Sessions will include different poster set ups, paper presentations, slideshows displaying art exhibits as well as “a lecture on the importance of undergraduate research from Dr. John Idoux, professor of chemistry at Tarleton State University and partner-in-residence at The Texas Bioscience Institute,” he said. All departments on campus are invited to participate in the event. The biology, chemistry, psychology, exercise and sports science, social work, graduate psychology and counseling, nursing, English, math, political science and others all have presentations prepared. For the poster session, student authors will be present from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Lord Conference Center in Parker Academic Center. Viewing times are from 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Different topics of research papers can be found in the same building, but in different classrooms. Times and locations vary throughout the day and are open to all students. Idoux’s lecture will be in Brindley Auditorium at 11 a.m. A slideshow featuring more than 40 pieces of artwork from senior art majors can be viewed between 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. in Lord Conference Center. Each student’s work has been exhibited in the Arla Ray Tyson Art Gallery in the past year. Terrell hopes to see many students participating. He even has an incentive. He said, “Students attending the poster or paper sessions will be eligible for a drawing to win an Amazon...

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Annual Cru Film Project debut soon
Apr12

Annual Cru Film Project debut soon

Eight years ago, two professors made a vision into a reality. Department of performance studies in the Communication and Media Studies, Dr. Diane Howard said she and Director of computer graphics design in the BCIS Department, Ms. Donna Teel began the Cru Film Projects to “give our UMHB students hands-on experience in the process of producing films from script to screen,” Howard said. Not only do the two professors want communication, film and graphic design students to succeed now, but after graduation. “We work at simulating a real-world film production process, so that our students are prepared to work on film sets and on film productions in real-world work,” she said. On April 18 this spring’s film, Choice Decision, written by sophomore computer graphic design major Sadie Meador, can be seen in Brindley Auditorium at 4 p.m. Other showings are April 19 at 11 a.m. and April 20 at 5 p.m. Pre-production begins each fall , and continues into the early months of spring. By this time, “film faculty have identified film students who would serve well in key leadership positions …. student director, first assistant to the director, student editor and assistant to the editor,” Howard said. Senior communication major Trey Hazelton worked on set as the gaffer. “It’s the lighting person during the filming,” he said. “For post-production, I’m the assistant editor, which is my main role.” Hazelton has never been part of a film production but he has learned more from working hands on. “I have to always be paying attention and ask questions, but at the same time it’s fun,” he said. The student director is chosen by Howard and Teel. This year, senior communication major and film minor Ashley Ramirez takes the leadership role. Her job has not been a simple task. “The biggest obstacle was learning my role as director. After doing other film projects, I was used to taking charge of the many details that go into these productions, costumes, schedules and props,” she said. Being the director of Choice Decision, she has to concentrate on the story and actors. Ramirez was one of the directors for Stunt Night. With this event, the cast had more freedom to create their own characters. “They told me what they want to do and I said ‘yes’ or ‘no.’ They told me what they needed, and I took care of it for them …. I kept things organized and easy,” she said. Casting calls were posted, a free workshop was provided and auditions were held on campus. After finalizing the cast, Ramirez and her crew began working fervently. Not only students are involved, but professional...

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Seniors take last shot at Stunt Night
Mar29

Seniors take last shot at Stunt Night

They have lived in living room closets and game rooms for years. When college students were children, they were played and loved dearly, and visions of playing either board games, or being addicted to a Nintendo, Play Station or any kind of video game are forever embedded in memories. It’s that time of year again, the time when classes compete against each other in the ultimate campus competition — Stunt Night. Games have been chosen as the theme. The individual classes are performing their representation of different forms of gaming. Senior class is portraying the classic video games they grew up with, like Mario Brothers, Donkey Kong and Sonic the Hedgehog. Creativity has been limitless for this group. Senior nursing major Andrew Kester has played a part in the annual Stunt Night event his whole college career. “The first two years, our class was rough, but last year was golden …. This year we are just building off last, and it’s only going to be better,” he said. Kester said their show is “incredibly witty and really funny,” which is what Stunt Night is all about. While the cast continues to practice for the big show Friday, April 1, many other students are working hard to make sure every detail is perfect for the performance. Senior elementary education major Rebecca Widmer is one of those. “I love Stunt Night and have really loved being a part of it every year that I have been at UMHB,” she said. Being a resident assistant has held her back from being part of the cast. For the past two Stunt Nights, she was not able to fully commit to attending every practice, so she works behind the scenes. “The seniors are amazing and so easy to work with, so it really makes my job fun and easy,” she said. Widmer and senior marketing major Julia Bishop are working together. The two have been brainstorming different ideas of what they’ll use for costumes and props. Most of which have been handmade during any free time they have. “Julia, some of the other seniors and I have thought of some really creative things to incorporate in the skit …. I think it will truly be a performance loved by all,” Widmer said. She is eager to hear laughter from the audience. “All of the classes have been working super hard to make their skits perfect,” she said. Senior psychology major Adam Fischer enjoys the practices because “all the fun you get to have with friends is just translated into a production.” Fischer gets to work with his close circle of friends, and is ready...

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Campus revival to focus on God’s grace
Mar29

Campus revival to focus on God’s grace

A revival is coming. Speaker Afshin Ziafat and the Jeff Johnson Band will be ready to speak truth and worship underneath a big white tent in the middle of the Quad beginning Monday, April 4, at 7 p.m. Everybody from campus and the surrounding communities are welcome to attend the three-night event. Freshman graphic design major Diana Fadal is on the publicity sub-committee. “I like being responsible for things week by week,” she said. The planning process has taken a year for the revival steering committee to prepare. Not only does everyone have a list of duties, but they are encouraged to reach out and build relationships with others. Fadal’s best experience so far is “getting to pray all together and interact with people outside of the committee.” A theme was decided in October 2010. After talking about the vision of how the committee should present the event to the university and community, grace came to mind. Fadal believes “Ocean of Grace” is a perfect fit for this year. “So many things have been popping up as confirmation,” she said. “It could only have been made by God.” After deciding on a theme, the full committee chose a verse to represent it. 2 Corinthians 15:10 says, “But by the grace of God I am what I am and His grace to me was not without effect”. The verse was selected because to the committee, there is no denying God’s grace covers all, can humble all and change all. “It just reminds me of how abounding His grace is for me. Sometimes I forget that and take it for granted,” sophomore math major Melissa Donham said. Freshman graphic design major Jacob Brenton serves on the publicity committee, and will attend his first Revival at UMHB. “I’m looking forward to seeing all of our heart work come to fruition, and seeing people who may never have given Jesus a thought get real with Him,” he said. Those attending revival, the speaker, band and all fine details have been prayed for since the forming of the committee. She is also ready to see how God continues to work in the committee. “I am excited that people are excited,” Fadal said. “I can’t wait to see who all comes and hear how God rocked their world and changed them.” Donham hopes the evenings run smoothly. “One thing I’ve always told myself is that no matter if we, as the committee, don’t get everything accomplished that we hope to, God will still be working at Revival,” she said. “He can use anything for His glory. That’s my prayer for this...

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State budget cuts impact both current, future Texas teachers

Graduation is May 7, and many students walking across the stage are receiving a degree in education. It has always seemed like a secure job choice. Children will always need an education; therefore, teachers will always be in demand … right? Unfortunately, wrong. This career option has lost some of its job security. Nearly $5 billion is being cut from the state educational budget. This proposal could necessitate larger class sizes and layoffs of thousands of current educators. Growing classrooms lead to crowded schools. This means districts will be cutting new jobs along with funding for educating students in public schools and on the collegiate level. With all of these cuts occurring, how can a student obtain a quality      education? Standardized testing is the definition of public schools in Texas. Curriculum is based on teaching students from kindergarten to 11th grade to pass these tests in order to move up in school and go to college. Passionate, well-qualified teachers are desperately needed in pubic schools. Put it in perspective. How many students at UMHB have had a football coach for high school math or history? At one a small town west of Fort Worth, Texas, football is everything. In fact, many teachers are football coaches who took over critical learning positions in the educational department. To make a long story short, not all coaches can teach. Where are all the teachers wanting to make a difference in students’ lives? In this type of school environment, they cannot be hired. Why? Because of district budget cuts the government has made. And unfortunately, the football department is more important at this particular school. The local parents care more about their children’s education than football. Not everyone learns at the same rate either. Educators are trained throughout school to get students’ attention and to keep it throughout class time. Also, they have to be patient with those who are slow learners in certain subjects. Too much of this is all too political. Getting down to the nitty gritty, students need good education. Not half met standards just to pass the TAKS testing. Teachers mold children – they always have. Two dear friends are walking across that stage at the Expo Center come May 7. Their perspectives have changed. No longer can they  be selective about the cities they want to live and teach in. They are determined to go where they are needed. Their passion is to make a difference. Not only does this proposal affect graduating students but incoming freshmen as well. financial aid for new students will be eliminated, and so will  some funding for four community colleges outside the...

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