Alumna plans to minister, inspire

Jena Coulson bubbles over with excitement when she says she wants to teach people everything she knows about Jesus. The senior mass communication/journalism major will have plenty of opportunity to do so when she assumes her new post as the university’s campus missionary for the 2009-2010 school year. A campus missionary in Texas serves on staff with his or her school’s Baptist Student Ministry, doing everything from building relationships with students and leading mission trips to filling out paperwork and writing reports. The goal is to bring ministry out of BSM buildings and into the midst of students on campus. “It is one of the most humbling experiences ever,” Coulson said. She first became aware of the position of campus missionary when a friend expressed interest in applying. “I looked into it just to understand where she was coming from; because I had no desire to do that,” Coulson said. “I wanted to make money.” That changed as she became increasingly involved with the BSM and went on a two-week mission trip to New York City during her junior year’s Christmas vacation. “I learned a lot, and it grew me,” she said. After co-directing the 2008 Missions Emphasis Week, Coulson felt drawn toward missions and decided to apply to be a campus missionary in Texas. “I really thought, ‘OK, God, I’m going to do this for you,’” she said. Coulson underwent an extensive application process that included interviews with local and state missions personnel before being selected as a Texas campus missionary. She and other accepted applicants were then assigned to schools based on recommendations by the state office of Go Now Missions and the Center for Collegiate Ministry. Director of Baptist Student Ministries, Shawn Shannon, believes Coulson will be an effective campus missionary and appreciates her dedication and positive attitude. “I admire how she fulfills her responsibilities and accepts necessary inconveniences,” Shannon said. “She embraces her opportunities and brings to them positiveness, which is very refreshing.” Shannon believes campus missionaries must be proficient at dividing their time between building relationships with people and accomplishing tasks, a quality she sees in Coulson. “When I have described being able to balance relationships and being on mission, she does so well at that,” Shannon said. “She can get things done and bring people along while she does it.” Senior education major Amanda Jane Foss has been friends with Coulson since their freshman year and believes Coulson has found the right place to serve. “I think she is very qualified and well placed,” Foss said. “She definitely has a heart for people and missions.” Foss echoes Shannon in praising Coulson’s commitment. “She...

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Sorry to leave the school once hated, eventually loved

I hated UMHB at first. I chose it on a whim, a sense that it was the place God planned for me to go. Transferring in during the spring of my freshman year, it didn’t take long before I started having second thoughts. The school was too small, the people too cliquish, and the football games nothing like watching the Aggies. More like watching my high school team. Actually, my high school was bigger. In short, UMHB had none of the vanities I always imagined would accompany the college experience, and I made plans to transfer out as soon as possible. Then something happened. I couldn’t leave. The Lord spoke clearly into my life through many ways and told me to stay. I hated Him for it. I felt shackled inside a prison of a Christian bubble I desperately wanted to escape. Then, over time, something stranger happened. I didn’t want to leave. Maybe it was the people, the unimaginable, overwhelming friendships with so many generous souls who invited me into their lives and loved me unconditionally. Maybe it was the school, so small I could walk to any class or friend’s room in ten minutes, meeting a dozen people I knew along the way. Maybe it was the football games, where I shook purple cans filled with who knows what, dressed in a ridiculous suit of armor, and jingled my keys at countless vanquished opponents. Now, three weeks away from graduating, I think on the times I watched movies in the lobby of McLane, or when I made my first attempt at cooking in the on-campus apartments, and I treasure those memories more than anything. I think on how the Lord has grown me as a man and a follower of Christ here, and all the conversations with so many friends who know more about serving God than I could learn in a lifetime. I think of how the Lord has guided me, brought me to this newspaper and filled my heart with a passion to serve Him through journalism. It blows me away. I once hated this school, but now I cannot bear the thought of leaving, knowing how far the Lord has brought me here and how many fond memories I will carry in my heart. I don’t worry that much about leaving a legacy; that is in God’s hands. I know that I am certainly not the most gifted writer, the most loyal friend, the most diligent student, or the most faithful Christian. I only ask that I be forgiven for my faults and remembered for the way God used me in spite of them....

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A few steps, a final stride, a new life
Apr21

A few steps, a final stride, a new life

May 9 will mark more than just a celebration of accomplishment. It will also bring to light the panic for graduates of what is next. As the economy tightens, and the hefty number of students crossing graduation stages, the National Association of College Employers says, “Employers expect to hire 22 percent fewer graduates than last year.” At least five UMHB students know their next steps. Furthering Education Business management major, Elliott Powell, will go to graduate school at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, Calif., for a degree in college counseling and student development. He said he hopes to eventually work his way up into a university vice president of student affairs position. As he works toward his degree, he has received a job at the university’s office of Student Success. Planning for this began when a  friend encouraged him to pursue a master’s in college counseling and student development. “I never saw myself being completely happy while working at a business, but I will love working with college students,” Powell said. He said UMHB has helped with the transition by providing him many opportunities. “It’s really easy to get plugged in here, and I think my involvement on campus really helped me get a job,” Powell said. As the time gets closer, his excitement is building. “I always knew I wanted to try something brand new after graduating, and I definitely think this is it,” he said. “This will give me a wonderful opportunity to grow as an individual because it will put me out of my comfort zone.” Medical pursuits Nursing major Angela Wass’ post-graduation plans include a 16-week internship as a pediatric intensive care unit nurse at Scott and White Hospital in Temple. She wanted to stay in the area. So when she got the official job offer in March, Wass was thankful God answered her prayers. After her rigorous training through the College of Nursing, she said it has more than adequately prepared her for any nursing career. Wass said she is excited to begin using what she knows. “I cannot wait to start and see what God has planned,” she said. “It will also be a challenge to see how well I can do on my own.” Trained to care Athletic training major, Laurie Martin, will apply her classroom experience to life as she becomes an athletic trainer for Lorena Independent School District. The recent confirmation unnerved her and brought great joy. “I am really excited to be going out into the ‘real world,’” she said. “Of course, I am a little nervous because I am going to be the only athletic trainer at the high...

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Blog – Security Cameras
Apr16

Blog – Security Cameras

Please, put cameras in the parking lots outside of buildings, UMHB. My car has been hit, keyed, and vandalized without any proof of who may have done it, and I am not sure if my car can take any more. It is expensive to the school, yes, but students and faculty can reap the benefits of the extra cost by saving money on getting scratches fixed and popping dents in our doors. We deserve to know if something happens to our investments in UMHB parking lots, so that we can ask who did it rather than asking ourselves why it happened. In my two years here, I have seen other cars get damaged and have suffered hundreds of dollars worth of damage to my once brand-new car. I would be more than happy to account for the hail damage during tornado season last year, but as for the other dents and scratches in my car, I am left with a bunch of questions and no answers. Again, I plead with you UMHB. Give us some security and accountability for what goes on in our parking...

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Video of the Week — Apr. 6 – Apr. 12

“Soulja Boi Tell ‘Em”...

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