Video of the Week Sept. 29 – Oct. 5

Hey everyone, I found this about a year ago and was fascinated with it. I never got a chance to do it myself, but I look forward to trying it soon....

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‘Remember the Alamo’ in library exhibit
Sep30

‘Remember the Alamo’ in library exhibit

The Alamo has become more of an icon than an actual event in the minds of many Texans. However, as part of the “Humanities Texas Traveling Exhibits,” rare Alamo images and historical information regarding the battle have been featured in the library. “For a lot of guys my age, who grew up in Texas, we feel like the Alamo is one of the greatest stories ever told — besides the birth of Christ,” Professor of history and political science, Dr. David Chrisman said. He enjoyed the exhibit because it was “as much about the portrayal of the event as it (was) about the historical facts of the battle.” Changing Perceptions of a Texas Experience was the title of the exhibit, which was created by the DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “There’s a lot of misconceptions about the Alamo,” said Anne Price, head of public services. “The images (were) here to provide accurate information about what happened and how people believe it to have happened.” It gives students the opportunity to gain the knowledge they would learn at a museum by visiting their university library. “The exhibit helped me realize that the battle still holds relevance to our culture, and that more than anything — it’s a symbol of courage,” library student worker junior Sarah Parry said. The Alamo exhibit has already been removed to make way for the October display, that arrives just in time for elections, called Campaigns, Elections, and Presidents. Price said “Our goal here at the library is to provide added interest and our exhibits and forums and art galleries (are) how we do...

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Wield the force like never before
Sep30

Wield the force like never before

“A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away… “The galaxy is on the brink of total darkness. The evil Galactic empire has overthrown the Old Republic and now holds countless worlds in the grip of fear. “The Jedi Knights have been all but destroyed. Only a handful have escaped Imperial forces, disappearing into hiding across the galaxy. “The Emperor’s spies have located a lone Jedi Knight on the Wookiee homeworld of Kashyyyk. The Sith lord, Darth Vader, has been sent to destroy him.” The Game In Review: A boy was kidnapped by Darth Vader on the planet Kashyyyk during the extermination of his father, the lone Jedi Knight. Darth Vader accepted the boy as his own personal apprentice and vowed to teach him the power of the dark side. The boy had a destiny. His name: Starkiller. Star Wars: The Force Unleashed is an action-packed game that allows gamers to use the force like never before. The sound, graphics and characters all tie into the Star Wars universe with ease. The story takes place between Episode III and IV as Vader is completing Order 66, the command to kill every Jedi. As Vader’s apprentice, Starkiller’s duty is to carry out his master’s orders, and doing so in the game makes Star Wars fans as giddy as a kid on Christmas morning. The presentation of the game is clear and makes use of brilliant lighting and great graphic elements. The sound: brilliant. Star Wars fans can reminisce over the many different theme songs they hear in the movies, along with several new compositions. Each planet that is visited has unique characteristics and parallels to what viewers see in the six Star Wars movies. Felucia is crawling with life and everything that is touched moves vivaciously. Kashyyyk is all fans could expect from the Wookiee  planet. Overall, the game does a great job in each area, excluding replay value. The 12-14 hour game is fun for about two run-throughs, but once  every upgrade and all of the different lightsaber power and color crystals are won, it becomes a little dull. The sheer amazement that one experiences when wielding the force like an excited infant is the best feature this game has to offer. Whether it is force lightning, force push, throwing the lightsaber or using a combination of each, this game has much to offer to Star Wars and video game fans...

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Burn after Reading fire extinguished

“What did we learn, Palmer?” barks the supervising government intelligence officer. “I have no idea sir,” replies the lower ranking officer. This is a small taste of the conclusion of Joel and Ethan Coen’s newest film, Burn After Reading. It finishes with two somewhat educated and respected men who are left sitting in bewilderment, urging one another not to repeat whatever it is they just did. The Coen brothers, who are famous for displaying the dark side of humor through their writing and directing style in such films as O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), The Big Lebowski (1998) and Fargo (1996), continue that pattern in the new release. Having just come off the success of the award winning movie, No Country for Old Men (2007), the Coen brothers decided to combine success in  their action/thriller film with their old standard, comedy. The result of this merger left movie goers less than satisfied and many film critics scratching their heads. It features a star studded cast, with leading names like George Clooney,  Brad Pitt and John Malkovich. It opens with a scene from the  CIA headquarters in Washington, D.C.  In the scene, seasoned CIA analyst Osborne Cox (Malkovich) is terminated from his job at the agency. His superiors list his alcohol abuse as the reason for his firing and stated it as a security risk. Cox’s reaction to the news sets the tone for the rest of the film. He begins with a string of obscenities and insults, all the while denying any responsibility for his current situation in a self-absorbed fit of rage. Each character is found to be an ignorant, selfish individual looking out only for himself. Each new one has his own role to play in this unfortunate series of events. Murder, infidelity, theft, fraud and deception all run rampant throughout the movie. Not one character in the film is motivated beyond anything but pure, selfish ambition. The film received an R rating for pervasive language, some sexual content and violence. Though this rating will be enough to ward off many students wishing to watch the movie, for those still planning on seeing the film — beware. While the rating system is often slightly off target, this one is right on. Burn After Reading boasts more than 60 obscenities as well as 30-plus instances of profanity in its 96- minute run time. Also, characters frequently change sex partners as if it were a handshake to be given to anyone they meet. Some will find the film enjoyable and ironic in a dark sort of way and will get pleasure in watching the pure, uninhibited stupidity of...

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SGA sets a higher bar when dealing with school issues
Sep30

SGA sets a higher bar when dealing with school issues

As students come back to school for the year and begin to settle into a routine, jobs and the often strange hours of college life, student associations have also begun preparations for the upcoming year. One important organization, if not the most significant to the student body, is Student Government Association. SGA is often an overlooked outlet for students to voice concerns, ideas and opinions. Leadership of SGA is reaching out to the students to aid in change. “We want students to voice their ideas,” Director of Student Oraganizations Kristy Brischke said. “Everyone can participate in student government; you don’t have to be elected to help with change. We want clear communication with the administration and clear communication with the students themselves. Our goal is to work as a clear channel between the two.” One issue student government faces is getting out information to the students themselves. They have tried to reconcile the issue electronically. “Our online voting last year seemed to work well and was more popular with students,” Brischke said. “We are looking into trying to increase our online capability as another way to get students more involved.” Newly elected freshman internal senator, biology major Andrew Christian, said, “I think the online voting is much better than any kind of written ballot. I believe it makes the voting based much more on who people believe will be the best candidate for the job rather than who is the most popular.” Senior student body president Tatenda Tavaziva said, “Unlike in years past, information about student government is now readily accessible online to anyone interested.” One way for people to have their voice heard is through Student Speak, which is when “the Vice President of Student Affairs, Steve Theodore, and myself sit and answer questions in the SUB,” Tavaziva said. “Or you could voice your opinion by just stopping me or anyone in SGA as we are walking and telling us any ideas, suggestions or proposals you might have.” These are just small examples of the steps the organization is taking to get students more involved. “Last year, through God’s help, I believe SGA laid a very solid foundation in terms of being the voice of the students,” Tavaziva said. “In my second year as president, I would like to see us raise the bar in every aspect of student government both internally and externally.” Raising the bar will be quite an accomplishment after the successful year in 2007-2008. Last year alone, SGA was responsible for not only doing away with the sticky sign-in/sign-out dorm process but also with the end of late night fines and the institution of...

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