Professors study how students are spending time

Two faculty members are conducting a survey to find out how UMHB students spend their time. The study began Oct. 19 and will end Nov. 2. It was created and is being supervised by Dr. Doyle Eiler, associate professor of marketing, and Dr. Paul Stock, assistant professor and chairperson of accounting, economics and finance. The survey asks students to record their time consumption by recalling how they spent their time in 30-minute intervals throughout a 24-hour period, beginning at 4 a.m. “After doing some research about when to end the day, we found that most students are done for the day by 4 in the morning,” Eiler said. “For some groups of people midnight would be a good time to end the day. However, for students we thought 4 would be better. With our original test groups, we also found that recalling what you did throughout the day in 30-minute intervals works much better than 15-minute periods or hour intervals.” Eiler and Stock have developed a list of 13 categories for students to choose from when recording their time usage. Some include sleeping, eating, personal care, class time, study time, work, activities and athletics. “I worked in industry and had never been at a university this small, and when I came here I had some expectations,” Eiler said. “I was surprised when students were in class taking and telling me about how much time they said they were working or that a number of students were taking courses at other universities at the same time they were going here. I was also very surprised by the magnitude of time that seemed to be consumed by athletics.” “So my question was ‘What are students doing with their time?’ If you are going to address the problem of students sleeping in class, are they just being foolish, or are they working a full-time job too? If a student skips class, is it because they are goofing off, or are they in the gym training or at a meeting for an organization or taking care of their children?” The U.S. Department of Labor did a similar survey on how students spend their time nationwide conducted from 2003 to 2005. The study concluded that students on average spend 8.5 hours sleeping, 4.1 hours in leisure and sports activities and 2.7 hours working. The survey here will not only focus on how typical undergraduate students spend their time but will also update the conclusions found nearly four years ago. “The Department of Labor used a diary method for their survey, but we thought that that method would be more tedious and less conclusive than...

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Living examples of faith and business
Oct21

Living examples of faith and business

Dr. Seuss wrote a book on the wisdom of traveling. He told the truth of life’s ups and downs for millions of 8-year-olds to read, but disregarding age, its accuracy still applies. He says going anywhere is possible which describes UMHB’s 2008 Missions Emphasis Week theme—“Oh, The Places We Go!” The event started Oct. 20 and will conclude Oct. 24 at the chapel service. “It is a great opportunity to meet missionaries from around the world,” campus missionary Erica Valenta said. “We have 35 missionaries coming who altogether have served in 35 different countries.” The spin-off of the Seuss rhyme stresses missions are anywhere and now. The week sets students up with opportunities to show up and talk. MEW will host a variety of things showcasing all the different experiences of the missionaries. “Dialogue with missionaries; they’re incredible people, but real people none the less,” junior co-director Dennis Greeson said. “They are here to meet with you. Go to the different events and seminars, grab a missionary for lunch or dinner, take advantage of the opportunity to simply learn and have your worldview expanded.” The missionaries brought more than a speech. They offer their lives as an example of what being a missionary looks like. Dr. Jim King, dean of the College of Business, uses many missionaries with business backgrounds in his class to show students tangible proof that missions and work do interweave. He said, “Faculty members can talk about the integration of faith and business to accomplish kingdom purposes. And some of us have practical experience in what is normally called Business as Mission.  But when students have real business people like Dwight Nordstrom telling the students how they run real businesses and accomplish kingdom purposes, it carries a lot of weight in the eyes of students.” As a teacher, King recognizes the importance of exposing students to information that could potentially encourage them to combine their skill and work desires with a kingdom view. “It is especially important that faculty do everything possible to help students understand how they can utilize the gifts and talents that God has provided them to make a difference in their professional fields,” he said. “This is true for all majors without exception.  I believe that MEW provides the most convenient vehicle through which faculty can bring in experienced individuals in many, many majors to help the faculty give credibility to what they are trying to show students about the integration of their faith into their chosen fields.” King said of the many things to do, he finds the Missions Fair and seminars to be most helpful. “I strongly encourage students...

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Send John McCain to White House
Oct21

Send John McCain to White House

In the movie Gladiator, Russell Crowe’s character, Maximus, declares, “What we do in life echoes in eternity.” The same could be said of the 2008 presidential election. On Nov. 4, citizens of the United States will face a choice that could alter the trajectory of the country for a generation, a choice that will define what America and its people stand for. Americans can choose to elect Barack Obama, a smooth-talking charlatan who is at once the most frighteningly leftist and egregiously unqualified presidential candidate in history. Or they can send to the White House a decorated war hero, a proven reformer, a man of character with a distinguished record of public service, a man named John McCain. The choice is clear: McCain for president. The United States today faces unprecedented challenges, and while McCain is far from perfect, he has shown that he has the experience, knowledge and judgment to be an effective president. The same cannot be said for Obama. McCain has the right ideas about fixing America’s economy. Throughout the campaign, he has advocated sensible economic policies such as low taxes to encourage job growth and restraining government spending to reduce the nation’s massive budget deficits that eat away at its future prosperity. Obama’s plan to raise taxes and massively increase federal spending will drive away jobs, bloat the national debt, and lead to economic ruin. McCain’s health care plan gives Americans tax credits to purchase their own insurance, giving individuals control over their health care. Obama promises government mandates and massive expansion of already unsustainable federal programs that put health care into the hands of bureaucrats. To achieve energy independence, McCain wants to utilize all of America’s resources, including wind and solar energy, but most importantly, expanded offshore drilling and nuclear power, two of the fastest, most reliable ways to increase domestic energy production. Obama’s reluctance to support increased drilling and his ridiculous plan to punish the oil companies who bring our fuel out of the ground is both unfortunate and extremely counterproductive. McCain has consistently demonstrated a solid grasp of world affairs and has the right approach to dealing with America’s enemies. He was an early critic of the Bush administration’s strategy in Iraq and a vocal proponent of the troop surge, which has reduced violence in the country to a level where American soldiers can now return home in victory, leaving behind a stable, democratic Iraq. McCain understands the danger posed by rogue nations like Iran and its resident madman Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who vows to obliterate Israel — and North Korea, which finds it amusing to test nuclear-capable missiles over the Pacific Ocean....

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University encourages different denominations
Oct21

University encourages different denominations

This institution prides itself on its Christian values and emphasizes the impact that students can make on the world as young adults. The campus is labeled as “Baptist,” but the university embraces thousands of students of diverse backgrounds. The student handbook says that the university prepares students to make a global, positive impact on the world through its “Baptist vision.” Is the Baptist vision that the university instills in each student welcoming to students of other denominations and religions? Sophomore organismal biology major Mike Kroll is Jewish and said that the people on campus have been very accepting and welcoming of his different beliefs. Kroll’s stand-up comedy routine includes Jewish humor, but he is a regular performer and fan favorite at Open Mic Night. His comedy routine and sense of humor have allowed him to have a positive outlook toward people who are critical of his faith. He said, “It keeps me strong in the face of animosity, even though I have not faced too many hard things on campus.” Kroll urges students to “get involved in the other religions, even if it is just a basic knowledge, so that you can strengthen your own faith. It helps you improve as a person.” Sophomore cell biology major Annjelica Madali is Catholic and has encountered discrimination at times because of her beliefs. “Some people are really nice about it and then, of course, there are some that are completely ignorant of the fact that other religions do exist,” she said. Madali also believes that a diverse religion base on campus is beneficial to the student body. She said, “It’s extremely important to have different religions on campus, so that people can learn to not be so close-minded to different ideas and beliefs.” Senior education major Amanda Foss has attended several different types of churches. “I don’t think people think of me any differently knowing that I am or was one denomination or the other,” she said. “I like all three denominations that I have been a part of and love worshiping at all of the different kinds of services.” For the most part, the view on campus is one of acceptance and finding the things each faith shares. Foss said, “I really think we all need to focus on what we have in common among all the different denominations of Christians, rather than focusing on all the differences.” To many students on campus, faith is the cornerstone of who they are and what they do. “My faith affects all of my life. It’s the foundation of who I am, and it impacts the way I try to live my life...

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World War II vets bring insight
Oct21

World War II vets bring insight

In the living room of Troy, Texas resident, Frank Thompson, junior history and political science major Olivia Gustin and senior history major Naomi Johnson recorded the stories of a World War II veteran. Unlike the tales of noble soldiers who went for days without food or water while pulling comrades to safety, Thompson told his story of what each brave soldier did every day. Gustin and Johnson are part of history/political science chair Dr. David Chrisman’s History Inquiry class. Members interviewed vets for the Veterans History Project sponsored by the Library of Congress. “It’s really nice because these are the stories that aren’t being told,” Gustin said. “This is the mass of the military. This is what got us through World War II are guys like him who did their job … ” Thompson was drafted from Texas A&M’s Corps into the Army’s 172nd Infantry Company H and served from February 1943 to September 1945. He fought in the Southern Pacific on the front lines and then returned to Texas to continue farming. Thompson said, “I was glad to give it (his story). I guess if I never give it, nobody will ever know about it.” The interview started for students in the classroom but it quickly grew into pure interest of first-hand experience. Johnson said, “I think what was interesting was a small-town boy from Texas being thrown into a worldwide phenomenon and seeing how he dealt with it.” One of the issues was coping with his brother’s death while he was still fighting in the southern Pacific. The reality of war hit Thompson in a few ways that surprised his interviewers. Johnson said, “There were times where it was very intense. We would ask him questions, anything to do with the combat that he was in. He would put his head down, and we would have to give him about 30 seconds to compose himself because the memories … were still so intense.” The outlook on the war also surprised Gustin and Johnson. “I think the thing that struck me the most, and where I actually expected the opposite, was in how he spoke about the war,” Gustin said. “I think history likes to paint World War II as some sort of patriotic rousing of the country, and that they were all behind it, and that they were all wanting to engage. But (Thompson) said if there hadn’t been a draft, they wouldn’t have gone.” His outlook created a similarity between Thompson and the people he fought. Johnson said, “He didn’t see them as an animalistic enemy. He saw them as boys who were on the front...

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