Charter day ushers in year 164
Feb10

Charter day ushers in year 164

The University of Mary-Hardin Baylor celebrated its anniversary by placing a wreath on judge R.E.B. Baylor’s grave 164 years after the charter was signed. The gift was given in honor of the founder’s accomplishments. The Campus Activities Board hosted a birthday party in the SUB to celebrate, offering balloon animals and cake to students who decided to join the merriment. The charter provided groundwork for two prominent Texas universities: UMHB and Baylor. Junior elementary education major Melody Haynes takes pride in the university’s colorful past. “UMHB’s rich history means that I am a part of something bigger than me,” she said, “It makes me proud to go to a school that has stood the test of time and come out stronger.” Haynes also feels the departure of President Dr. Jerry Bawcom will be noticeable in the history of the school. She said, “Dr. Bawcom has done so much for this university. After 19 years of service, I think everyone will miss him.” Sophomore biology and athletic training double major Sherissa Hua also noted that Bawcom has been a large influence at UMHB. “He will be greatly missed because he has been a great supporter of our school,” she said, “He constantly cheers for our sporting events and is a great leader. He has taken part in defining our school as a whole just by being there and helping to make changes in even the littlest of aspects.” Hua said that Charter Day is an important celebration because “that was the day our school was born. We would not be here without it.” Sophomore history major Ryan Boyd thinks that one of UMHB’s greatest achievements was the integration of males to the school in 1971. He said, “The fact that I am able to be a part of this prestigious school gives me a sense of pride. I am glad that males are actually able to come here now because we get to experience privileges that we may have not otherwise been able to experience in the past here.” Boyd also added that “UMHB sports would not be what it is today without the integration of men to the school.” The university has a rich history which started 164 years ago, leading to the school’s move to Belton in 1886, followed by the establishment of the first work-study program for women and several name changes. Some notable achievements include establishing the first school of journalism for a women’s college and being recognized as the first Texas Baptist school. The Charter Day chapel featured guest speaker Dwight Edwards, class of 1980. Edwards challenged students not to just exist, but to live....

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Ministry’s journey sparks progress
Feb10

Ministry’s journey sparks progress

Historical leaders cast vision, building on the directors of their past and making their own revelation for the future. The student-led organization, Focus, sponsored by the Baptist Student Ministry, has been built on by many, and new leaders leave their marks behind. Focus meets every Wednesday at 8:28 p.m. in Manning Chapel. Since August, the ministry has concentrated on a new yearning for the campus. Sophomore theology and philosophy major Joe Giles is the current student coordinator and has been a part of the ministry since his freshman year. “I got involved with Focus very quickly. In the first two weeks, I was just doing slides, and then, not even halfway through the semester, I was going to the planning meetings.” Giles has been able to see a change in Focus within the last year— a new thirst for God. “There has been much more emphasis on prayer, but beyond that, I think the big change is with the hearts of the students coming,” he said. In the past, students mainly gathered to socialize, but now Giles said their reason for attending has changed the overall feel of worship. “It’s a different atmosphere than last year. This year there is a hunger, such a hunger that people are meeting before hand to pray,” he said. The idea of worship has taken a new shape. “(It) is not a building, speaker or band. Worship is coming fully and submitting yourself fully to God and what God has in store for you,” Giles said. When Focus first started this year, Giles had a vision. “My hope and goal is that people come even hungrier, that it doesn’t stop at Focus, that they don’t think worship is once a week, but they bring worship into their daily lives. And they take their worship experience that they have at Focus, and . . . dive deeper into their own churches.” His prayer is that every Wednesday night, the Focus team and the speakers are able to provide a place of worship and time to focus on one thing: allowing the passions of the students to expand. “I don’t want it to stay confined in Manning Chapel. I want it to spark hearts and lives to be able to do what God has called them to do here on this campus and further,” Giles said. Shawn Shannon, the Baptist Student Ministry director, has been a part the Focus ministry and has also seen changes. “I have seen an increasing student fingerprints on it that students own it,” she said. She has observed not only a boost in attendance, but also more variety. “The Focus crowd...

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Baseball team leaves batting box in a sprint
Feb10

Baseball team leaves batting box in a sprint

Cru baseball split Saturday’s doubleheader against Texas Wesleyan University. UMHB fell 14-12 in game one, and then picked up an 11-2 victory in the second game. This brought the team to a 2-3 season record and knocked them down to third in the American Southwestern Conference rankings. With this being the first week of the season, head coach Micah Wells said he has been anticipating the dynamic of this season’s team because of all the new faces on the field. “We have had the luxury of returners and stability,” he said. “There are a lot of new faces, and with that there is excitement. Seeing these guys come together, start to gel and play as a team is where the real excitement comes in.” He said in preparation for the challenges that lie ahead, the team spent quality time doing drills to learn to work together. “We are looking at having a new short stop, first baseman, second baseman and third baseman. So we are working hard to find out what everyone’s strengths and weaknesses are and communicate. These are all issues that come up in a game,” Wells said. As the team continues to prepare for the season, Wells said the team just needs to focus on playing the game as it knows how. “We have good, talented baseball players that work hard and have great attitudes,” he said. “So, if we can go out there and play hard and do the things we coach and practice like we are trained to do, then I think the wins will take care of themselves.” Junior Andrew White said the team’s youth would not take away from its abilities. “The team has shown a lot of character,” he said. “A lot of younger guys have had to step up in key positions. The older guys have taken them under their wings. It has been a key asset to our team’s growth.” White said as the team continues to play together, kinks will be ironed out. Looking back at the Southwestern game he said the team has put it behind them and will focus on eliminating big innings. “If we could eliminate that one big inning from them, there was no way their team would be able to beat us,” he said. After the team fell to Texas Wesleyan University, White said the team is regrouping and will keep on trucking. “Coach has told us, baseball is a game of failure. If you dwell on the past, there’s nothing to be achieved. Take it one pitch at a time,” he said. Senior pitcher Hunter Hawkins said he, too, has looked forward...

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Filling  Tatenda’s Shoes
Feb10

Filling Tatenda’s Shoes

“Good. Better. Best. Never let it rest, until the good is better and the better best.” -Tatenda Tavaziva Student Body President Garret Smith Junior mass communication/public relations major Q- How do you define good leadership? A- I think good leadership is for one thing, having not just a knowledge of how to lead, but two, taking the initiative of actually doing that, and once you start the course not letting up. Tommy Wilson Junior marketing major Q-What do you hope to do if elected? A-One of the main things I hope to do if elected here at Mary Hardin-Baylor is to continue helping build community. I know that’s a constant goal we’re working on, and we’re continuously trying to work on that, but the more that we press toward that and we really have that on our hearts and have that as our focus, I think we can achieve it. Kimberly Jones Junior history major Q- What experience or qualifications can you bring to the position? A- I was student body president in high school. I was freshman class chaplain, and I served two years on the executive cabinet. I am now internal vice president …. I have the leadership and administration gifts that I am ready and just excited to be using more on this...

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Oldham named university provost
Feb10

Oldham named university provost

The long search for university provost ended Jan. 23 after Christian studies professor and interim provost, Dr. Steve Oldham, accepted the permanent position. Oldham’s official position, provost and vice president for academic affairs, means he will serve as the chief academic officer. He will preside over all academic programs and associated faculty. “I see the job as the provost as sort of a facilitator, helping the faculty to do what is most important at UMHB, which is to teach and mentor our students,” Oldham said. “I want to do everything in my power in terms of opportunities, new types of initiatives to help our faculty to flourish.” As he prepares to serve the faculty in their growth, Oldham said he hopes to expand his range of faculty members. “One of the joys of this position, so far, has been the opportunity to get to know the faculty better,” he said. “It is nice to get to know all the excellent people we have across campus.” Working with the president-designate, Dr. Randy O’Rear, is another interesting aspect for Oldham as he anticipates future change. He credits President Dr. Jerry Bawcom’s leadership as a solid foundation to build on. “UMHB is in a very good position right now. There are some growth areas, but there aren’t a lot of wholesale changes we need to make. Yes, we will see some improvements, but we will be standing on the shoulders of what Dr. Bawcom has already achieved here. I am looking forward to Dr. O’Rear’s leadership. He is a collaborative leader. He wants to involve as many people as possible in the decision making, and I think there is wisdom in numbers.” Oldham meets the transition from professor to administrator with excitement and enthusiasm, but the opportunity is also bittersweet. “Teaching is my first love, and it will always be, so it was a difficult decision for me to step out of the classroom and come into an office,” Oldham said. “My interaction with students has certainly decreased. I am not teaching nearly as much as I used to, so it is a big sacrifice.” Although Oldham has moved to different pastures, he will continue to minimally teach, which he said will keep his foot in the door. Oldham and his students have begun to prepare for the effects of his absence as a professor. Junior Christian studies major Geoff Payne said Oldham has played a significant part in his life in and out of the classroom. Payne, an honors student and friend of the professor, has spent many hours with Oldham. He influenced Payne’s ways of reasoning and learning. He also...

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