Unplanned pregnancies not without hope, future

THE BELLS — A group of people entered the room of a Bible study group for moms with young children at Grace Church in Southern Pines, N.C. They took their time, speaking a word to each woman.

 
UMHB sophomore public relations major Elena Aydelotte was the last to be spoken to.
“When they got to me, they were just ecstatic,” she said.

 
They believed God had something big in mind for Aydelotte.
But Aydelotte wasn’t so sure. She began praying fervently. She asked God, “Lord, what do you have for me?”

 

Several prayers later, Aydelotte believed God had called her to the pro-life cause.  She began volunteering with Life Care Pregnancy Center in Carthage, N.C.
“I became a counselor and made some bonds with women there that were coming in,” she said.

 
The women Aydelotte counseled were single moms in crisis — a role she would soon play.

 
After the birth of her third child, Aydelotte knew things at home weren’t in order.
“I walked upstairs at home one way and walked down a single mother in crisis,” she said.

 
So she packed up and came back to Temple, her hometown.
“Let’s just say I was pretty angry at God.” Aydelotte thought, “What’s the use of being good.” So, she said went on the “dark side for a little bit.” Yet, God wasn’t complacent with the lifestyle she had adopted. Her pro-life journey wasn’t over.

 
Aydelotte began attending church again but felt that with all she had done, she could never be a counselor again.

 
Then one day, she said. “I was having stomach cramps” and was told she needed an ultrasound. Aydelotte had no medical insurance. She went to Hope Pregnancy Center in Temple to see if they’d provide a free ultrasound.
She told them, “I’m not pregnant, but you guys have an ultrasound, and can you just look at me and say you need to go to the emergency room or not?”

 
They didn’t give her the ultrasound. What they did give her was another opportunity to fulfill a purpose for her life.
“By the time I left, they had handed me a volunteer packet and told me when training was and that they’d love to have me.”
God wouldn’t let Aydelotte off the hook.

 
Her mother told her, ‘if I didn’t have that abortion, you wouldn’t have been born because I wouldn’t have been able to get pregnant with you. That’s why your purpose is pro-life so his life is not in vain.’ To Aydollete, that’s God saying that her aborted brother’s life still has meaning.
“When God does something, He gives you confirmation. … I’m where I’m supposed to be.”

 
Hope Pregnancy Center began in 1980 as an alternative to abortion. Their web site, http://www.hopepc.com, describes that they are trying “to meet the emotional, spiritual and practical needs of women experiencing unplanned pregnancies.” They provide several services: free pregnancy tests, free ultrasounds, after abortion support, and the Earn While You Learn Program (dedicated to teaching healthy parenting while allowing participants to earn items to help take care of their newborn’s physical needs).

 
Junior marketing major Ryan White said, “It’s awesome that there’s organizations popping up that encourage people to follow through with their pregnancy.”

 
There are centers located in Killeen and Copperas Cove as well. And they don’t provide assistance for women only. They have counseling services specifically tailored for men.  In all cases, Hope Pregnancy promises confidentiality unless written consent is given for information to be shared.

 
One of the main goals for Hope is for those who come in to “know the love of Christ,” Aydollote said, “but we aren’t pushy.” They also want to offer clients “hope for a future.” The centers also want those in unplanned pregnancy situations to have knowledge about what their options are.

 
“We are God-driven and centered.” Each person that comes through the door of one of the pregnancy centers is prayed for.  Aydollote encourages other UMHB students to get involved. Training is provided for every position, and doing something as easy as answering calls would go a long way.

 
Abby Johnson worked in the abortion industry for years before having a change of heart. She encourages this generation of students to take a stand for life.
She said, “We need their voice. We need them volunteering in pregnancy centers. We need them in front of abortion clinics. We especially need them to be vocal about abortion.”

Author: Tyler Agnew

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