No end in sight for basketball lockout

The NBA preseason is scheduled to begin Oct. 9. The season opener is meant to start Nov. 1.  However, hope for these events to take place as planned is quickly dwindling.

For the first time in 13 years, the NBA is at a major disagreement.  The last lockout resembling this one was in 1998-1999, and the season was shortened to just 50 games.

It is the players against the team owners, with the owners wanting to cut back on the players’ income budgets from around $2.7 billion down to $2 billion annually for the next 10 years.

Head coach for the UMHB men’s basketball team Ken DeWeese said, “The players are making more money, are treated more luxuriously and have better working conditions than ever before in the history of the NBA.”

The owners on the other hand have seen the value of their franchises sky-rocket and while not full in cash, the value of the franchise is considerably more than they paid for it originally.

Not only does the stand-still affect the player’s wallets, but also the advertiser’s pocket change.

“Both sides may be forgetting the fans, not to mention the corporate ticket buyers, and billions to televise the games,” De Weese said.

Dallas Mavericks center Tyson Chandler (6) doesn’t like the call in front of Miami Heat center Joel Anthony (50) during Game 5 of the 2011  Finals. Now the championship victory for the Mavericks seems years ago due to all the attention focused on the lockout. (MCT Campus)

Dallas Mavericks center Tyson Chandler (6) doesn’t like the call in front of Miami Heat center Joel Anthony (50) during Game 5 of the 2011 Finals. Now the championship victory for the Mavericks seems years ago due to all the attention focused on the lockout. (MCT Campus)

Not only are the teams to blame, but also the owners.

“Both sides are at fault and should quickly begin to understand the future viability of the NBA, monetary-wise, is at stake,” DeWeese said. “Therefore, negotiations, in very good faith, need to be immediately started.”

Players and team representatives have been meeting to try and sort out the complicated issue, but so far no solution has been reached.

Just as the NFL is having major issues with players and owners making their expected earnings each year, the NBA is also dealing with this. In reality, it is the behind-the-scenes people, like those who work in the stadiums, who will feel the most hurt by the NBA losing so much money.

The lockout has been going on since July 30 and could end up costing the NBA millions of dollars and losing many fans.

Assistant coach for the UMHB men’s basketball team Jimmy Smith said, “I do know that the majority of the teams in the NBA are losing money. With the vast popularity of the NBA, that just doesn’t seem right. When it comes down to it, the NBA is a business, and the goal of both the owners and the players is to make money.”

Many fans are trying to offer hypothetical answers to the situation.

“I’m not sure what the solution is ­­— profit sharing, adjusting the salary cap, etc…. but I feel like everyone loses if they don’t play, so hopefully they can come to an agreement soon,” Smith said.

In the end, an agreement must be made before too much money is lost.

These selfish times may seriously affect the NBA in the future.  If the focus was put back on the sport, then things  might come together more quickly.

Senior pre-physical therapy major and UMHB basketball player Mark Jones said, “It almost comes down to greed. Give any garbage man the salary of the lowest paid  NBA player, and I guarantee he would never complain about loading trash again.”

Author: Kirby Franze

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